Having a round without a beer after.

RichA

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Driving home from golf last year I went into the back of someone doing 5 mph at a junction. It bogged me off, I needed a new bumper. I had drunk 1 pint. I don’t think in any way shape or form the pint affected what happened but I was glad I was not over the limit. That was a wake up call.
For me, when Golf returned after Covid I started drinking a cuppa tea and a slice of cake after a round. The club now has Ghost ship 0%.. it is gorgeous.
I never feel under pressure to have a drink and I am happy to socialise without the need to have a few.
Our club doesn't, sadly. I get it from Tesco for home consumption, when I'm resting my liver. It's much nicer than the normal version and the best low alcohol beer I've found.
 

Tashyboy

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Our club doesn't, sadly. I get it from Tesco for home consumption, when I'm resting my liver. It's much nicer than the normal version and the best low alcohol beer I've found.
To be honest Rich I am gobsmacked at how nice it tastes. There is another 0% at the club I tried. It was shocking.
 

Orikoru

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So you do drink and drive then! :LOL: I once had a pint before a round, I felt fine walking to the tee but when it came to swinging the driver I could definitely feel a lack of coordination (more than normal :p). Golf is hard enough without alcohol.
Branching away from the main topic a little bit, I can never understand the American culture around golf now, which judging by some of the Facebook pages I follow, seems to be to get absolutely rat-arsed on the course to the point you can hardly finish your round. What's the point of that!? There are plenty of places and occasions to get drunk, but I play golf to actually play golf. 😂 As you say, it's hard enough sober.
 

GB72

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I guess where I was different to many on here is that, in the main, I would class the people I played golf with as Acquaintances rather than mates. Sounds harsh on my part I know but they were simply that, people I played golf with and I did not really socialise with them outside of the golf club (and the golf club was never a big part of my life). The person I did socialise with and play golf with lived in my village so we headed home, ditched the car and walked to our local.

Not meaning anything in a disparaging way but I did not have massive amounts in common with the people I knew at my golf club, we chatted golf and sport in general, you know those conversations where you look for some common gorund without really getting involved in people's personal lives, but they were not close enought that I wanted to sit and have half a dozen pints with them and so I was always happy to have a quick coffee and head off.
 

IanM

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Branching away from the main topic a little bit, I can never understand the American culture around golf now, which judging by some of the Facebook pages I follow, seems to be to get absolutely rat-arsed on the course to the point you can hardly finish your round. What's the point of that!? There are plenty of places and occasions to get drunk, but I play golf to actually play golf. 😂 As you say, it's hard enough sober.
Yep... I've played plenty of places in America, cannot believe how much on course drinking went on.

Seen something similar on the odd occasion in the UK. Gang of lads at a well known resort, got "on the bevvy" before they went out and took some cases of beer on the course with them. Crashed a buggy.. one guy got a broken leg and then a bill for new buggy. Wombats.
 

GB72

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Yep... I've played plenty of places in America, cannot believe how much on course drinking went on.

Seen something similar on the odd occasion in the UK. Gang of lads at a well known resort, got "on the bevvy" before they went out and took some cases of beer on the course with them. Crashed a buggy.. one guy got a broken leg and then a bill for new buggy. Wombats.
I have seen it on a fund raising day. Organisers thought it would be a good idea (with the consent of the club) to load up a buggy with cases of beer and drive round selling them to raise extra funds. No crashed buggies but some very long rounds as people lost the ability to play or simply lost interest full stop.
 

Slab

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My after golf food and drink is very different here than it was in the uk

No doubt the hot weather plays a part but golf and the clubhouses I've found to be far more accessible and relaxed than I'd previously experienced so it's rare not to have drinks after a round and means a round of golf will last at least 6 hours and my wife knows that (&will often meet me afterwards anyway)

Id now hate it if post round F&B became any kind of contention for playing golf

Just make sure you'll get home safely and leave when you're ready
 

harpo_72

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The words your looking for “no thanks lads, I’m driving”
I’ve had 3 friends and 1 colleague die at the hands of drunk drivers.
So foxtrot Oscar to anyone that believes a pint and drive is still okay.
On that note, I see a full car park and old boys necking pints .. some are on the teas and coffees but there still is a stalwart bunch of drink drivers .
Perhaps the club needs to remind folks about the limits and put the non alcohol beers on
 

rudebhoy

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Yep... I've played plenty of places in America, cannot believe how much on course drinking went on.

Seen something similar on the odd occasion in the UK. Gang of lads at a well known resort, got "on the bevvy" before they went out and took some cases of beer on the course with them. Crashed a buggy.. one guy got a broken leg and then a bill for new buggy. Wombats.
Was at Close House a couple of weeks ago. Walked into the restaurant at 9.45 am, there was a bunch of guys all with pints in front of them. A few of them were on whisky chasers as well. Got chatting to one of them on the practice green a little later. I said something along the lines that golf was hard enough stone cold sober, never mind with a pint or two beforehand. He said that's nothing, we've come down on a coach from Glasgow this morning, set off at 5.30am and some of them have been drinking all the way down on the bus!

They had the 6 tee times immediately after us. Needless to say, we never saw any of them after the first tee.
 

patricks148

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Branching away from the main topic a little bit, I can never understand the American culture around golf now, which judging by some of the Facebook pages I follow, seems to be to get absolutely rat-arsed on the course to the point you can hardly finish your round. What's the point of that!? There are plenty of places and occasions to get drunk, but I play golf to actually play golf. 😂 As you say, it's hard enough sober.
I've done a bit of caddying of late all Americans, every one of the groups have been drinking, Tuesdays all had at least two hip flasks and one had a bottle if malt to top them all up. Last weeks all the bags were full of cans and they were quite put out when the bothy was closed so they couldn't replenish the 4 or 5 cans they had already drank. By the sounds of things drink driving in the US isn't a problem?
 

BrianM

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Never have a drink and drive, it’s zero tolerance in Scotland anyway.
I enjoy a dram on the way round, but if I’m having a drink I get picked up.
We play Castle Stuart a few times a year and we normally get a mini bus taxi that picks us all up and drops us off again at the end of the day.
 
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I'm on a golf tour next week in Scotland. Generally, we have a soft drink after the game, along with soup and sandwiches. Then it's back to the hotel, and we tend to get into a bit of a session.
However, as has been mentioned in this thread, Scotland's drinking laws being as they are, if we have a skinful, and set off to another course early next morning, it could be that we are still over the limit.
Back home, it's coffee for me after the game, but many of my group enjoy a pint or two.
 

Bunkermagnet

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TBH, I’m totally amazed that this is even a topic of conversatio.

My license gives me my job, so it’s tea after a game and alcohol only when not driving for the rest of the day.
 

Fromtherough

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Having a pint or two after a round is a pleasure and something I really enjoy. However, as with every other time I drive a car I need to be responsible for my actions. This usually means either a pint or a shandy maximum. However, I can walk to my club in approximately 6 mins, so if I do fancy a few more pints I just leave the car.

I’ve only ever had a pint during/before a round on one occasion, on an away trip. Ruined the round I’d been looking forward to for a few months.
 

sunshine

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Having a pint or two after a round is a pleasure and something I really enjoy. However, as with every other time I drive a car I need to be responsible for my actions. This usually means either a pint or a shandy maximum. However, I can walk to my club in approximately 6 mins, so if I do fancy a few more pints I just leave the car.
You live a 6 minute walk from the club but you usually drive?
 

sunshine

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If you don't have a locker the walk could be awkward.
I know I wouldn't fancy walking to my club, down the main road, behind my trolley.
Don't ever ever play Mill Hill.

It's a good 6 minute walk from the clubhouse to the first tee, along the busy A1 three lane dual carriageway.
 
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