Accents

Ethan

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Is it 'Biting the hand that feeds you'

Asking for a friend.
Golf is played on an all-Ireland basis, including NI. Clubs affiliate to the Golfing Union of Ireland. McIlroy, McDowell, Clarke all played for Ireland even though 2 of them come from the unionist side of the divide.

Rugby is much the same.
 
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Voyager EMH

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Its a shame, a real shame, that we feel we have to tread on eggshells with regard to people's cultural identity on the island of RofI and NI. I can claim the English flag by birth or the Scottish or Welsh flag by grandparents. I wish it could be as easy and non-controversial for the people on/from NI to do the similar thing without prejudice. We all should have the same right to acknowledge and embrace our heritage, if we so choose.

Lets get back to accents. There are many Irish accents, when speaking English. They all sound great to me.
South African is the one I find hardest to mimic.
I heard the parents of the hurdler Colin Jackson speak on the telly one time. They had a blend of Caribbean and South Wales. Sounded absolutely beautiful to me.
 

Hobbit

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Most people born in NI can claim dual citizenship, UK and Irish. Your choice depends mostly on your cultural identity.
Interviewing in Belfast a number of years ago; Head of Recruitment asked a candidate why they had an ROI passport. The young candidate squirmed, not wanting to give a wrong answer. I stepped in to say it’s a valid passport, and that’s all we need.

I ‘educated’ the RM afterwards.
 

Ethan

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Interviewing in Belfast a number of years ago; Head of Recruitment asked a candidate why they had an ROI passport. The young candidate squirmed, not wanting to give a wrong answer. I stepped in to say it’s a valid passport, and that’s all we need.

I ‘educated’ the RM afterwards.
After Brexit, a lot of people in NI who previously wouldn't have acknowledged the idea of them having an Irish identity have suddenly discovered it, given the benefits of continued EU citizenship.
 

IanM

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In 1999 when I went to work in Glasgow, my colleague was from overseas and we we talking about the wonderful diversity with which English is spoken.

The waitress in the restaurant was very pretty and we were chatting her up (badly) and I said to my oppo that she had what was obviously a Northern Irish accent.

She laughed and said, yes everyone said that, but in fact she was French, went to uni in Scotland and for reasons unknown, spoke English with a Belfast accent. She said her mates were all Glaswegian , and didn't know any Belfast folk...

...so , Marsellies plus Glasgow equals Belfast. ... or it did in her case!

Wonderful stuff...
 

Kellfire

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After Brexit, a lot of people in NI who previously wouldn't have acknowledged the idea of them having an Irish identity have suddenly discovered it, given the benefits of continued EU citizenship.
I’ll certainly be getting my Irish passport when I can be bothered but I’m also not offended by people thinking I’m Irish, even if I do correct them when they get it wrong.
 
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Having lived near Guildford in the 1970's the old locals had a nice mild 'ampshire accent but I would probably agree that Surrey does not have an accent now.
Have to suggest that the fairly distinct soft Surrey-Hampshire borders accent you mention is still there. It isn’t strong and it isn’t ‘posh’ Surrey as it picks up a fair smattering of the rural North East Hampshire accent. Both my children have this accent - and you can certainly hear that it isn’t pure Surrey (if there is such a thing now), and with Aldershot just 4miles away it certainly isnt North East Hampshire. As you say it’s actually a really nice accent…

Also listening to LBC fairly recently an Eastern European lass who had lived in the Scottish Borders for quite some time phoned in. The Scottish aspect of her accent was really strong and mixed in with her background accent I really struggled to understand her. I got the impression that good old Liverpudlian lass Shelagh Fogerty didnt understand a word that was said 🤣

As for mine…well it’s a mild (quite proper but not too posh) Glaswegian - with strong west coast and some highland tinges. And despite having lived in south of England for nearly 40yrs I am surprised how so many still struggle to understand me … ah - hold on…😉🙄
 
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Doon frae Troon

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Good to hear that the Surrey/Hants accent is still with us.
Two of my friends down there worked as a farm labourer and a woodman both were good cricketers, I could listen to them speak for hours.
Two of the most balanced, sensible and happy people I have met.
 
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I am fortunate to have relatives in the Hebrides and Aberdeenshire. The difference in Scottish accents they have for such a short physical distance (by today’s measures) of separation is brilliant. My Hebridean relatives speak English with their beautiful soft Hebridean Gaelic accent and dialect, my Aberdeenshire ones with their a times incomprehensible Buchan Doric accent and dialect 😻
 

stefanovic

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Can't stand the Liverpool or Birmingham accents.
I'd better give you some tips on how to understand the Brum dialect just in case you have the misfortune to be in Birmingham.

The toyme is foive and twenty to fowa.
The time is twenty five minutes to four.

Oyd loyke an oyscreme.
I'd like an ice cream.

Yam gooin to where?
Where are you going to?

Also:
'Thems' means they.
Yow means you.
Arhh means yes.

Far simpler than finding you way around the adjacent Black Country, because in Wolverhampton, Sandwell, Dudley and Walsall you will need a phrase book.
 

Fade and Die

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I'd better give you some tips on how to understand the Brum dialect just in case you have the misfortune to be in Birmingham.

The toyme is foive and twenty to fowa.
The time is twenty five minutes to four.

Oyd loyke an oyscreme.
I'd like an ice cream.

Yam gooin to where?
Where are you going to?

Also:
'Thems' means they.
Yow means you.
Arhh means yes.

Far simpler than finding you way around the adjacent Black Country, because in Wolverhampton, Sandwell, Dudley and Walsall you will need a phrase book.

I remember sitting next to a group in a bar in Malta all chatting away….. took me 10 minutes before I realised they were English! Turns out they were from Wolverhampton!😂😂😂
 

Hobbit

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After Brexit, a lot of people in NI who previously wouldn't have acknowledged the idea of them having an Irish identity have suddenly discovered it, given the benefits of continued EU citizenship.
Similarly, a lot of those born in England with an Irish parent. Very tempted but I was born in England.
 
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