Accents

Foxholer

Major Champion
Joined
Nov 16, 2011
Messages
20,693
Location
Wasting away again in Margaritaville
Been a long while since I've seen/heard that expression, even having spent several years in Edinburgh (where some of the 'warmest' English is spoken'!
Scottish (East Calder from memory) Grandmother had an accent that was pretty strong - even having been in NZ for getting on 60 years, though 'came' to a small mining community with plenty of other Scots - and filled with 'localisms' (Tattie Bogle being the most memorable).

Most accents, including mine, seem, to me, to be born out of lazy pro(or e)nunciation and similar lazy speech - dropping/combining some words. Other contributors are words from 'old' languages. William's post demonstrates each of those! A Welsh guy (with wonderful lilt) I knew had a Norwegian wife. They went to a wedding in Newcastle area where she had no problem understanding the (Viking sourced) speech but he was lost!

Kiwi accent was once described by Dame Ngaio Marsh as 'Queens English spoken with the tongue sitting on the bottom of the mouth like a dead fish'!and the Aussie one as 'spoken while constantly squinting from the sun'!
 

williamalex1

Money List Winner
Joined
Apr 7, 2012
Messages
11,739
Location
uddingston
Been a long while since I've seen/heard that expression, even having spent several years in Edinburgh (where some of the 'warmest' English is spoken'!
Scottish (East Calder from memory) Grandmother had an accent that was pretty strong - even having been in NZ for getting on 60 years, though 'came' to a small mining community with plenty of other Scots - and filled with 'localisms' (Tattie Bogle being the most memorable).

Most accents, including mine, seem, to me, to be born out of lazy pro(or e)nunciation and similar lazy speech - dropping/combining some words. Other contributors are words from 'old' languages. William's post demonstrates each of those! A Welsh guy (with wonderful lilt) I knew had a Norwegian wife. They went to a wedding in Newcastle area where she had no problem understanding the (Viking sourced) speech but he was lost!

Kiwi accent was once described by Dame Ngaio Marsh as 'Queens English spoken with the tongue sitting on the bottom of the mouth like a dead fish'!and the Aussie one as 'spoken while constantly squinting from the sun'!
Scottish, naw yer urnae, urye ? :ROFLMAO:
 

Voyager EMH

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 14, 2021
Messages
868
Location
Leicestershire
"Haddaway 'n (mod edit) must be equally as good.

Edit: Ah, this post looks daft on its own now since the removal of another rather naughty post.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

RichA

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 24, 2021
Messages
837
Location
UK
If I were to write a phrase phonetically to describe the Leicester town accent, I would have to do it in two completely different ways in order for a north-easterner or someone from Central Southern England to get my gist.
For instance, if I travel 50 miles south of here, the phrase, "Half a glass of draught Bass" becomes "Harf a glarss of drarft Bess" to my ear.
Are you making that journey in a time machine? I can't remember the last time I saw Bass on sale.
As a Notts boy, I find it easier to describe the Leicester accent as simply a wrong version of my own, but you'd probably say the same about us.
The strangest thing I find with English accents is that very rural West Country and East Anglia sound almost identical where the local towny accents are totally different.
 

HeftyHacker

Active member
Joined
Aug 14, 2020
Messages
347
As a Lancashire lad it absolutely fascinates me how many accents there are in such a small relative area.

I'm from rural Lancashire and my accent is very different to someone ten miles away in Preston, who in turn has a different accent to someone from Blackburn, or Accrington or Bolton or Burnley or Wigan. Even moving to Poulton now I think the Blackpool accent is different again - it took me a while to pinpoint what it was but they really emphasise the first syllable of whatever sentence they're saying.

My dad is great to listen to as he is always coming out with phrases or words you just don't hear any more, he's lived in the same village all his life.

"Aye that'll be gradely, thankyup"

I always thought I had a fairly neutral accent but apparently I'm quite broad, and I think I've got broader with age as well. I think I lost it for a while but then as soon as I was back with my mates from home it came back instantly.
 

Robster59

Tour Rookie
Joined
Aug 7, 2015
Messages
3,851
Location
Newton Mearns
On holiday last week we met my son. As we were talking we subconsciously fell into our Widnesian accent. My partner (from Glasgow) and his girlfriend (from Surrey) said they had difficulty following what we were saying.
Mind you, I was told today by my stepson's girlfriend that she sometimes struggles to understand my accent. Makes a nice change for an Englishman living in Glasgow :LOL:
 
Top