Accents

SocketRocket

Ryder Cup Winner
Joined
Sep 12, 2011
Messages
16,887
I'd better give you some tips on how to understand the Brum dialect just in case you have the misfortune to be in Birmingham.

The toyme is foive and twenty to fowa.
The time is twenty five minutes to four.

Oyd loyke an oyscreme.
I'd like an ice cream.

Yam gooin to where?
Where are you going to?

Also:
'Thems' means they.
Yow means you.
Arhh means yes.

Far simpler than finding you way around the adjacent Black Country, because in Wolverhampton, Sandwell, Dudley and Walsall you will need a phrase book.
Bosting
 

Lilyhawk

Swedish Cam Impersonator
Joined
Oct 5, 2018
Messages
1,454
Location
Whetstone
As an outsider, and probably with an accent that may be a delicate taste to a lot of people, there are quite a few English accents I’m not particularly fond of.

The worst of them all are the Love Island (yes, I consider it a millennial “I-wanna-grow-up-to-become-an-influencer) along with the Essex accent, although they in a lot of cases intertwine. Oh, the gangsta blud/innit is up there too. Makes people sound thick as 💩
 

Rooter

Money List Winner
Joined
Jan 30, 2012
Messages
10,186
Location
Newbury
Rural Berkshire (Bark shire) here, my kids sound like a cross between farmers and stupid American YouTubers.

I would say my accent is usually very much home counties, bordering on west London, but when I used to drink, the Wythenshawe from my mum came out! Always handy when you don't want to be called out as a southern shandy when in the north! :LOL:

I love listening accents, the only one that grates me is a high-pitched female Belfast accent... ooooofff it could turn milk!!
 

Orikoru

Tour Winner
Joined
Nov 1, 2016
Messages
15,974
Location
Watford
Rural Berkshire (Bark shire) here, my kids sound like a cross between farmers and stupid American YouTubers.

I would say my accent is usually very much home counties, bordering on west London, but when I used to drink, the Wythenshawe from my mum came out! Always handy when you don't want to be called out as a southern shandy when in the north! :LOL:

I love listening accents, the only one that grates me is a high-pitched female Belfast accent... ooooofff it could turn milk!!
You didn't enjoy watching Derry Girls then I take it.
 

Imurg

Grand Slam Winner
Joined
Mar 15, 2008
Messages
31,108
Location
Aylesbury Bucks
The old Bucks accent is very rarely heard these days..
When we were nippers, the old couple next door were so broad in it we could barely understand them.
Hard to pinpoint a description but, to give you an idea, the word Cows was pronounced Kays..it was a weird thing to listen to.
One word has become a "family" word..more of a phrase really.
At down't ackle means that doesn't fit or it's out of place/ doesn't go together...
 

Voyager EMH

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 14, 2021
Messages
1,050
Location
Leicestershire
Attempting to write phonetically what you perceive to be an accent gives away what accent you have or what you perceive to be a "neutral" accent, which is still an accent.
If I were to write a phrase phonetically to describe the Leicester town accent, I would have to do it in two completely different ways in order for a north-easterner or someone from Central Southern England to get my gist.
For instance, if I travel 50 miles south of here, the phrase, "Half a glass of draught Bass" becomes "Harf a glarss of drarft Bess" to my ear.
My attempt at phonetics should make no sense to some and perfect sense to others.
Such a discussion is best done audibly, I believe.
I love accents and the differing vowel sounds. Also, it really confuses Americans, which I find highly amusing sometimes.

 

stefanovic

Medal Winner
Joined
Oct 21, 2016
Messages
904
I like the Bristolian accent.
It's rhotic (never heard of that word either until just now).
"Post-vocalic r in words like car and card is still pronounced, having been lost from many other dialects of English. "

They also put an l on the end of words ending in a.
As in prima donna being pronounced primal donnal.
 

SocketRocket

Ryder Cup Winner
Joined
Sep 12, 2011
Messages
16,887
I like the Bristolian accent.
It's rhotic (never heard of that word either until just now).
"Post-vocalic r in words like car and card is still pronounced, having been lost from many other dialects of English. "

They also put an l on the end of words ending in a.
As in prima donna being pronounced primal donnal.
Indial is a malerial areal.

Lancs is also Rhotic as is much of Wessex.
 
Top