Would you buy an electric car?

pauljames87

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Not gonna be the cheapest of options that surely? Would happily buy electric if I could justify it but as a low mileage user the purchase costs currently are exorbitant
We own one car at a time and PCP the other ATM

Soon as one gets paid off we keep it and PCP a second so the "fleet" is only 6-8 years old

Lockdown meant lots of uncovered desks due to covid so managed to get enough overtime to buy a second hand Alhambra outright to see us a while with the twins

Honda PCP is up in April mother in law is buying it off me

So going electric with other .. Alhambra will do 5k miles a year
 

pauljames87

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If the range was comparable to a tank of petrol/diesel and the new purchase costs were similar, then yes I would consider them a lot more.
I can see longer term issues though with charging of them. Only this morning I saw a dustman trip over the charging cable plugged into a lampost with the lead dragged along the pavement/gutter then behind a car next to the lampost then into the pug on the car which was on the live side of the traffic flow. Luckily the dustman didnt hurt himself or anything nearby, but it could have been much worse.
250 miles for a 64kw Hyundai Kona

My hrv petrol does 350 miles per tank

Only 100 miles difference
 

Green Man

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I haven’t gone full electric but I have a 330e Hybrid.
One thing to be careful of is ensuring there are charging points available to use where you will need them.
I have the backup of petrol but it’s amazing when your out and about how many public charging points don’t work for one reason or another.
 

clubchamp98

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Thinking about it .
Have a 18 plate troc but I hardly use it it’s done 7k in 2 1/2 yrs.
If the prices drop yes.
But as more cars go Electric more charging points will be needed and that’s just not happening by me.
 

CliveW

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I might consider one when I can satisfy myself that the production of the lithium for the batteries is environmentally friendly as is the electricity that it runs on. Ideal for cities where pollution from internal combustion engines is a problem, but the pollution from the generation of electricity has to go somewhere.
 

pauljames87

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I might consider one when I can satisfy myself that the production of the lithium for the batteries is environmentally friendly as is the electricity that it runs on. Ideal for cities where pollution from internal combustion engines is a problem, but the pollution from the generation of electricity has to go somewhere.
That's the thing tho. Once on electric yes the pollination from making electric is there it's easily solved and can solve many people at once

If half the population took up electric cars by 2035.. they can switch the grid to nuclear .. wind power etc much easier than everyone switching cars
 

Bunkermagnet

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That's the thing tho. Once on electric yes the pollination from making electric is there it's easily solved and can solve many people at once

If half the population took up electric cars by 2035.. they can switch the grid to nuclear .. wind power etc much easier than everyone switching cars
I hear that arguement, but how long can we mine the various countries for the lithium required?
If we were investing in and pushing towards hydrogen power I could buy into it much more easily but replacing one finite energy source for another doesn’t seem anything other than short sighted
 

PhilTheFragger

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I haven’t gone full electric but I have a 330e Hybrid.
One thing to be careful of is ensuring there are charging points available to use where you will need them.
I have the backup of petrol but it’s amazing when your out and about how many public charging points don’t work for one reason or another.
This :

Our drivers are required to deliver an electric vehicle with 80% charge, so they have to find a rapid charging point fairly close to their destination.

I’ve lost count of the times a driver has reported that their preferred charging point is either out of action or has a queue.

Also when we collect an electric vehicle, sometimes it only has a small charge left, and believe me, it’s no fun chasing a working charging point with rapidly diminishing power and no back up
 

pauljames87

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This :

Our drivers are required to deliver an electric vehicle with 80% charge, so they have to find a rapid charging point fairly close to their destination.

I’ve lost count of the times a driver has reported that their preferred charging point is either out of action or has a queue.

Also when we collect an electric vehicle, sometimes it only has a small charge left, and believe me, it’s no fun chasing a working charging point with rapidly diminishing power and no back up
This is why I won't get one without installing charging at home

Problem is it's not ideal for everyone
 

Smiffy

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This is why I won't get one without installing charging at home

Problem is it's not ideal for everyone
If somebody comes in asking about electric cars, the 1st question we have to ask them is whether they have off road parking and are able to install a charge point.
Peugeot have a tie in with PodPoint at the moment, and you can get a wall charger fitted for just over £150.00 (or thereabouts).
You can charge the car up from a domestic 3 pin socket but it takes ages and you have to pay extra for the cable. The type 2 cable comes standard with the car.
We also recommend the download of an App called "Zapmap" which gives you real time information of charge points on your given route.
 

Neilds

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Are electric cars that much cheaper to run than a conventional car? If you are doing 50-60 miles each day for work, I imagine most will put it on to charge each night which would cost £2-5 (guessing) so about £60-£150 a month. This is only a few tanks of fuel so is the saving as great as people say?
 
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I'm using an e208 at the moment. It suits me perfectly. I literally live 2 miles (if that) from the showroom and we have two charging points at work. A full charge lasts me the best part of a fortnight. I love it. Can't remember the last time I went to a petrol station.....

I've never really been a Peugeot fan, but the e-208 is a smart looking motor. I took one for a short test drive and loved it, it's a little smaller than my GLA, but for a run around it seems perfect. Didn't get a chance to try putting clubs in with the back seats down though. Can I get two sets in with a trolley, that's the big question?

I'm working on the basis that if we ever go back to normal, I'll only be back in the office once a week or, once in two weeks, at least that's what I've asked for. I'll mostly use the Volvo for that, but would like to drive the other car once or twice a month to split the mileage/ cost etc.

This :

Our drivers are required to deliver an electric vehicle with 80% charge, so they have to find a rapid charging point fairly close to their destination.

I’ve lost count of the times a driver has reported that their preferred charging point is either out of action or has a queue.

Also when we collect an electric vehicle, sometimes it only has a small charge left, and believe me, it’s no fun chasing a working charging point with rapidly diminishing power and no back up
If I do go with the e-208, I'll definitely have the charging point installed at home. It's subsidised to install, and is supposed to be a standard fit common with most electric cars (not sure about Tesla but unlikely to get one of those any time soon).
 
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Thread starter #35
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Are electric cars that much cheaper to run than a conventional car? If you are doing 50-60 miles each day for work, I imagine most will put it on to charge each night which would cost £2-5 (guessing) so about £60-£150 a month. This is only a few tanks of fuel so is the saving as great as people say?
Costs me about £15 of diesel per round trip to the office (130 miles). Before lockdown was spending approx £60 a week on diesel. If I'm only going once a week, twice at most, that's halving my use, if I split that with an electric car, it reduces it further. Similar to Smiffy, Mrs wedge does about 3 miles each way to work, maybe a little more queueing at busy times, but if the car costs £5 to charge, she can possibly run on that for a week or two (if I don't run it down). She normally puts £30 or so of diesel in the second car, electric has to be a saving for both of us.
 

pauljames87

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Are electric cars that much cheaper to run than a conventional car? If you are doing 50-60 miles each day for work, I imagine most will put it on to charge each night which would cost £2-5 (guessing) so about £60-£150 a month. This is only a few tanks of fuel so is the saving as great as people say?
If you charged every night on the cheap 5p tariff where you get 4 hours cheap

You could constantly top up your battery to keep it at max level..

Charging 4 hours at 7kw on the charge points at 5p would cost £1.40

Now I don't think your commute would even need the full 4 hour charge personally ... So maybe even £1

£7 a week for fully 4 hour charging a night

£28 a month

That's cheap
 
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Smiffy

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I've never really been a Peugeot fan, but the e-208 is a smart looking motor. I took one for a short test drive and loved it, it's a little smaller than my GLA, but for a run around it seems perfect. Didn't get a chance to try putting clubs in with the back seats down though. Can I get two sets in with a trolley, that's the big question?
Honest answer is, I don't know for sure, but my guess is that you could. Peugeot also offer the 2008 (small SUV) as an all electric which will definitely cope, but obviously that is a bit more expensive.
I'm very impressed with the new 208. Good looking car, fantastic range of engines, and as I say, I love driving the electric version.
 

bobmac

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I might consider one when I can satisfy myself that the production of the lithium for the batteries is environmentally friendly as is the electricity that it runs on. Ideal for cities where pollution from internal combustion engines is a problem, but the pollution from the generation of electricity has to go somewhere.
''SVOLT, based in Changzhou, China, has announced that it has manufactured cobalt-free batteries designed for the EV market. Aside from reducing the rare earth metals, the company is claiming that they have a higher energy density, which could result in ranges of up to 800km (500 miles) for electric cars.''

https://www.pocket-lint.com/gadgets...in-seconds-last-months-and-power-over-the-air
 

pauljames87

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''SVOLT, based in Changzhou, China, has announced that it has manufactured cobalt-free batteries designed for the EV market. Aside from reducing the rare earth metals, the company is claiming that they have a higher energy density, which could result in ranges of up to 800km (500 miles) for electric cars.''

https://www.pocket-lint.com/gadgets...in-seconds-last-months-and-power-over-the-air
If that comes into play then surely majority of arguements are out the window

Just then would be charge time
 

hovis

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My wife was forced to swap her company car from an audi diesel to a tesla. We save an absolute fortune on fuel. I mainly drive this car and I'm at least £200 a month better off on my own. My colleague has leased a Citroën electric car with a range of 160miles. He's worked out it will pretty much paid for itself in fuel.
Also, electric cars drive better. They're alot smoother, quieter and more responsive
 
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