Preferred courses

SwingsitlikeHogan

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I can put up with a lot, if not most, of any downsides any course or club might have if the location and views lift my heart, and it is peaceful enough for me to enjoy them and switch off from the rigours and problems of life.
 

richbeech

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Condition of the course and aesthetics are probably two of the biggest factors, then layout and variety of holes. Also you mustn't underestimate the difference undulation changes makes to a course. They can really transform a good course into a great one IMO. For example, I wasn't blown away by Woodall Spa because I thought it was too flat and personally I prefer somewhere like Hollinwell or Formby. Then if the course meets the above criteria, it's just the welcome you get in the pro shop, clubhouse and on the first tee if they've got a starter. Top top courses always have a different feel about the place when you arrive on site that's hard to articulate.

Edited to say also if they've got a nice comforting clubhouse that does good value tasty food and a good selection of drinks.
 

Neilds

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I totally agree about undulating courses. Used to play RAF inter station matches at Burford which is a course that is always immaculate, but boy is it boring. Seems to be very similar par 4s which are dead flat. Add in no water and it just seemed bland
 

CountLippe

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For me the plot of land is the biggest factor. Courses which meander through the topography and look as if they've been designed by nature. I think there can be a point of diminishing returns regarding condition, as long as the greens are true and the general area neat and tidy, I don't need it to be perfectly manicured. Sometimes being a bit rough around the edges adds a bit of charm. Scenery is an 'x - factor', the Scots are really lucky.
 
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For me the plot of land is the biggest factor. Courses which meander through the topography and look as if they've been designed by nature. I think there can be a point of diminishing returns regarding condition, as long as the greens are true and the general area neat and tidy, I don't need it to be perfectly manicured. Sometimes being a bit rough around the edges adds a bit of charm. Scenery is an 'x - factor', the Scots are really lucky.
Have you played Hindhead or Hollinwell?
Both are built beautifully into their surroundings
 

Slab

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It should have a wide fairway par 4 as the 1st hole (nothing destroys pace like an opening hole unsuited to its task)
Teeing areas in good condition
Distinct tee marker separation (don’t stick whites and yellows within a few steps of each other)
Well prepared fairways and smooth greens
No crossover or adjacent holes
Don’t stick the next tee box near the green (other than the odd partial glimpse I can’t even see the teebox from any green I’m playing)
Mix of par 3 length
Course set up to the forecasted conditions and field
Decent vistas
 

Boabie

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After playing a course, months later the more holes you remember for positive reasons the better the course. Fraserburgh Corbie Hill is fantastic, each hole has something special though the 1st and 18th do lack features. My favourite hole in the whole world is the par3 7th to get there comes the pleasure of 3rd 4th 5th and 6th once it's past the pleasures of 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th and 17th each hole should have its very own adjective. In dry weather Radley College 9 hole has the College Oak believed to be the oldest oak tree in the UK also a par 3 over a Capability-Brown designed lake. Minchinhampton Old Course no bunkers summer hazard can be when you come face to face with a big hairy beast or something the beast has left behind, natural landscape views of vineyards, points of historical interest, though some areas are suffering from soil erosion.

On the other hand if you leave a course with negative thoughts related to the actual course (not the weather) then it's easy to distinguish from the the good.
 

r0wly86

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Course design, using natural contours is my preference. Changes in elevation, having to use course strategy. Why I don't like RND most holes I can blast driver, will find my ball and have a shot in, not very interesting.

Can't say I particularly enjoy flat courses, especially if they're up an down tree lined.

The course should be fair, a good shot should be rewarded.

Other than that I prefer heathland courses and moorland, I like the soil type, and the use of heather and gorse just looks nice.

If a course can top that off with vistas or if the holes themselves are aesthetically pleasing then that's even better
 

Backache

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The course should be fair, a good shot should be rewarded.
Not wishing to be to argumentative, but are there many courses where a good shot is not rewarded?
I can think of a few where poor shots aren't unduly punished and a few where occasionally a good shot can meet with an unlucky bounce, but on most of these it is rare and possibly adds to the character.
 
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Not wishing to be to argumentative, but are there many courses where a good shot is not rewarded?
I can think of a few where poor shots aren't unduly punished and a few where occasionally a good shot can meet with an unlucky bounce, but on most of these it is rare and possibly adds to the character.
Isn’t that the ‘fun’ of links golf?
 

D-S

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A bit of wildlife around is always a bonus, certainly was at Leopard Creek, Hans Merensky and Skukuza just up the road.
 

mikejohnchapman

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Lots of threads on here about people saying course x is better then course y, etc but no one ever seems to say why. I sometimes think that people prefer one course over another because they score better at one but this can’t be the only reason. Is it the condition of the course - if so what in particular, the experience (whatever that means) or something else?
The GM Top 100 Rating system assesses courses roughly a third on design and test, a third on condition and presentation and a third on "environmental" factors such a facilities, visual appeal and experience.

However, as others have said, much of your opinion will be coloured by your love of a particular type of course (links, heathland, etc)

So there is an attempt to quantify an opinion even if there is still judgement involved.
 
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Jigger

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Multiple factors for me but I think if it suits your game, you enjoy it more and therefore prefer it.

I like courses that are
- challenging but fair - no Mickey Mouse holes squeezed into an odd place
- feel away from other groups - not crammed into a small price of land
- well looked after - no jungle in the copses or unnecessary long rough to shape the hole. I.e easy to find your ball
- decent speed greens
- raked bunkers
- generally in decent condition - in the main season
 
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