Moving tee markers to help alignment

rulefan

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The teeing area is a rectangle, not a parallelogram

At any rate, the direction of play might be different for different golfers.
Yes. the area is enclosed by lines at right angles to the line joining the front of the tee markers. ie the two vertical dotted lines in the diagram. The ? ball is outside the area.
 

rulefan

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I believe that to be true. But can we find that in the rule book?
The definition spells it out:

The teeing area is a rectangle that is two club-lengths deep where:

  • The front edge is defined by the line between the forward-most points of two tee-markers set by the Committee, and
  • The side edges are defined by the lines back from the outside points of the tee-markers.
**** Too slow ****
 

Voyager EMH

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I knew the correct answer.

What has puzzled me, and I've discussed this with golfers before, is that the "Direction of Play" arrow is misleading and/or superfluous.

One may play in any direction from the tee?
 

Swango1980

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I knew the correct answer.

What has puzzled me, and I've discussed this with golfers before, is that the "Direction of Play" arrow is misleading and/or superfluous.

One may play in any direction from the tee?
The arrow is probably very useful in dealing with the exact question you asked.

If the arrow wasn't there and somebody was just using the diagram to understand the rule, they MIGHT think you get 2 club lengths back in line with their direction of play / general direction of fairway. But, with the arrow there, it is clear the teeing area does not have to go back in line with a direction of play, it is simply a rectangle with the front defined by a line between the tee pegs
 

Voyager EMH

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The arrow is probably very useful in dealing with the exact question you asked.

If the arrow wasn't there and somebody was just using the diagram to understand the rule, they MIGHT think you get 2 club lengths back in line with their direction of play / general direction of fairway. But, with the arrow there, it is clear the teeing area does not have to go back in line with a direction of play, it is simply a rectangle with the front defined by a line between the tee pegs
Which makes sense only if you know and accept that the teeing area is always a rectangle.
Without that knowledge, a player might consider that the side edges of the teeing area are parallel to the direction of play as defined by the single arrow.

As in, for example only, "I'm measuring my two club lengths straight back in line with the direction of play which is straight down the middle of the fairway. Its not my fault that the greenkeeper has set the teeing area up at a wonky angle."

If there is a need for an arrow in the diagram something like this might be better

direction of play.jpg
 

rulie

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Beware of the "mouthy nightmare"!
I have another question.

What is the correct teeing area if the markers have been set up so that the direction of play is not at 90 degrees to the line between the markers?

View attachment 50743

If the direction of play is the thicker arrow, is the ball with the ? below it in or out of the teeing area?

I have taken the direction of play to be a straight shot played down the centre of the fairway that comes to rest in the centre of the fairway with no significant deviation to the left or right in the air or on the ground before coming to rest.
The teeing area is a rectangle created by the tee markers set by the Committee. The ball with the ? is not within the teeing area. I've seen tee markers at our course set such that the line perpendicular to the front edge points into the penalty area on the left of the fairway. That does not change the shape or size of the teeing area for that hole - it's still a rectangle.
 

rulie

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Which makes sense only if you know and accept that the teeing area is always a rectangle.
Without that knowledge, a player might consider that the side edges of the teeing area are parallel to the direction of play as defined by the single arrow.

As in, for example only, "I'm measuring my two club lengths straight back in line with the direction of play which is straight down the middle of the fairway. Its not my fault that the greenkeeper has set the teeing area up at a wonky angle."

If there is a need for an arrow in the diagram something like this might be better

View attachment 50746
The definition of teeing area says, "the teeing area is a rectangle...." and carries on to say that one side is "defined by the line between the forward-most points of the two tee-markers set by the Committee".
In other words, the Committee has established the teeing area, it's not determined by the player(s) or their desired line of play.
 

Voyager EMH

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In the example below the prepared tee is rectangular and generally in line with the hole which is generally straight and flat.

A player has teed his ball only one club length back from the marker nearest to him as he approached the tee. It is outside the teeing area.

wonky tee area.jpg
 

Swango1980

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In the example below the prepared tee is rectangular and generally in line with the hole which is generally straight and flat.

A player has teed his ball only one club length back from the marker nearest to him as he approached the tee. It is outside the teeing area.

View attachment 50747
I'm not sure what point you are trying to make. The rule is clear, the definition is clear. You say you understand it. We understand it. What else needs to be said!?
 

Voyager EMH

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I'm not sure what point you are trying to make. The rule is clear, the definition is clear. You say you understand it. We understand it. What else needs to be said!?
To make interesting reading for others. That was my point.

Arguing is not a necessity.
You are allowed to not argue or find fault with me. I won't mind.

I have seen scenarios such as I have pointed out. The varying points of view that were put forward by experienced players was always interesting.
Yet the rule and definition is very straightforward.

The rectangular teeing area can be at a very jaunty angle to the rectangular prepared cut tee.
The teeing area is defined by the two markers and not by a line of direction of play.
 

rulie

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To make interesting reading for others. That was my point.

Arguing is not a necessity.
You are allowed to not argue or find fault with me. I won't mind.

I have seen scenarios such as I have pointed out. The varying points of view that were put forward by experienced players was always interesting.
Yet the rule and definition is very straightforward.

The rectangular teeing area can be at a very jaunty angle to the rectangular prepared cut tee.
The teeing area is defined by the two markers and not by a line of direction of play.
I've seen some players very confused (and annoyed) when the tee box lines up to the fairway but the mower cut is at an angle to the centreline of the tee box. Of course, neither of those impacted the setting of the tee-markers.
Weak-minded players!
 

Swango1980

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To make interesting reading for others. That was my point.

Arguing is not a necessity.
You are allowed to not argue or find fault with me. I won't mind.

I have seen scenarios such as I have pointed out. The varying points of view that were put forward by experienced players was always interesting.
Yet the rule and definition is very straightforward.

The rectangular teeing area can be at a very jaunty angle to the rectangular prepared cut tee.
The teeing area is defined by the two markers and not by a line of direction of play.
I've seen experienced players get just about every rule wrong, even the most basic of ones
 

Steven Rules

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The rectangular teeing area can be at a very jaunty angle to the rectangular prepared cut tee.
Committee Procedures 6B recommends that each set of tee markers should be positioned such that the front edge of the teeing area is pointed at the centre of the landing area.

I am sure we have all experieced instances (several times per round!) where the tee markers are not set in accordance with that guidance.
 

Voyager EMH

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Committee Procedures 6B recommends that each set of tee markers should be positioned such that the front edge of the teeing area is pointed at the centre of the landing area.

I am sure we have all experieced instances (several times per round!) where the tee markers are not set in accordance with that guidance.
Exactly this.
We have a dogleg where players who can carry 250 yards over trees have a much different line of play to those who carry 180 yards while both are aiming for the middle of the fairway.
The tee markers are unvaryingly set up for the shorter hitters' line. I see nothing wrong with this. It conforms with the parallel lines of the whole tee.
This is a tee where I usually take my stance outside the left marker as this makes "my" fairway as wide as possible.
 

jim8flog

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I once read a book about setting up golf courses and tricks done to deliberately try to fool golfers.

Two of which were

1. Build the tee so it does not align with the likely line of intended play.
2. Mow the tee box so the lines of the mowing do not align with the likely line of intended play.

I always smile at players who complain about this and players that want to put the ball at the very front edge of a teeing area - really is a few inches going to make that much difference to what shot you have next.

I have watched players set up in an absolute mud bath of an area of the tee because it is the very front which was chosen by most players whereas going back a yard or two gives a near pristine area.
 

salfordlad

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To make interesting reading for others. That was my point.

Arguing is not a necessity.
You are allowed to not argue or find fault with me. I won't mind.

I have seen scenarios such as I have pointed out. The varying points of view that were put forward by experienced players was always interesting.
Yet the rule and definition is very straightforward.

The rectangular teeing area can be at a very jaunty angle to the rectangular prepared cut tee.
The teeing area is defined by the two markers and not by a line of direction of play.
I agree it is a good and reasonable question to ask because the answer provided in the definition (rectangle) seems counterintuitive if faced with some truly stupid tee marker positions. In that scenario, I would be very confident that breaches occur on a not uncommon basis.
 

bobmac

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If was playing in a competition, I wouldn't touch anything but in casual play, I would definitely move block A back in line with block B
UntitledAA.jpg
 
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