Is this the end of WFH?

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Bunkermagnet

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Did you work in London? Any given lunch time the shops and restaurants were/ are rammed with people buying food or overpriced coffee
The coffee is only overpriced if you go to one of the fashionable Coffee outlets. I can get 3 cups of quality fresh coffee for the price of 1 of your Starbucks, and I work in London.
 
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just because they have done so in the past doesnt mean we should just sleep walk back into that way of working

the gov only want people back at work because of investments in property and being landlords

lets build a better economy not just flog a dead horse
Indeed - where are the leading manufacturers of gas lamps/lighting these days...ah...electricity came along...
 
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I was down in London last summer for a mini break, staying near some major office sites. I was very taken by the world that is built up around offices, coffee shops, sandwich bars etc, the post work visit to the pub as well. It really is very different to the rest of the country in that way. It still exists in other cities but not on the scale of London. WFH will definitely impact those add on businesses far more in London than elsewhere.

As for Pret.........you barely see them up here or in other Northern locations. Maybe in a train station and the odd high street but they are not a player. In London o_Oo_O, hundreds of them all over. They are hugely exposed if people do not return in numbers.
Maybe - however the 'dying' high streets of many country and (certainly London) commuter towns might experience a rejuvenation due to more WFH. There are certainly (early) signs of this in my town. We can but hope.

As it happens - my daughter (26yrs) has started going back into the office typically 2-3days a week. She doesn't mind the half hour drive and enjoys the social interaction she gets with others in the office. Asked whether she could get the same interaction over zoom/Team video calls she said she couldn't as she doesn't actually work directly on anything with the others in her office as the work with other consultants and so they don't ever get together on video conference calls. I am not sure whether or not she has been asked to go in to the office or if she has been given the choice. As mentioned my wife was given the choice and has chosen 100% WFH. The age differential?
 
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Lord Tyrion

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Maybe - however the 'dying' high streets of many country and (certainly London) commuter towns might experience a rejuvenation due to more WFH. There are certainly (early) signs of this in my town. We can but hope.
That is very true and is certainly a plus in spreading out the wealth. It doesn't help the business on a long lease at high rents committed to that city location though. They can't just pick up sticks and re-locate at the drop of a hat.. There will be winners and losers, as always, but for the losers it will be quite brutal.
 
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Mudball

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Maybe - however the 'dying' high streets of many country and (certainly London) commuter towns might experience a rejuvenation due to more WFH. There are certainly (early) signs of this in my town. We can but hope.

As it happens - my daughter (26yrs) has started going back into the office typically 2-3days a week. She doesn't mind the half hour drive and enjoys the social interaction she gets with others in the office. Asked whether she could get the same interaction over zoom/Team video calls she said she couldn't as she doesn't actually work directly on anything with the others in her office as the work with other consultants and so they don't ever get together on video conference calls. I am not sure whether or not she has been asked to go in to the office or if she has been given the choice. As mentioned my wife was given the choice and has chosen 100% WFH. The age differential?

WFH has been brutal to the younger workforce. Their lack of experience of an office is not going to help. We saw it have a lot of down side for the young esp those who live in London and are suddenly forced to WFH in small london flats along with their partners. The oldies dont want to go in. Tomorrow, I have a large client meeting in London where we have people from various parts of the country + Europe jetting it. Spend the day in a room in London office. It will be like 2018 all over again.. Cant Wait
 

Mike79

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We've been told 2-3 days in the office, which I am doing. The social interaction is a bonus, but due to a dispersed team in multiple locations, and the 2-3 days not being the same for everyone, I spend my day in the office on Teams calls rather than being back in meeting rooms... no different to when I am at home. Except working at home is a better environment as less background noise (nobody sitting at the desk beside me also on a Teams call!).

Finding recruitment a challenge, as "the market" appears to show fully remote or only in the office when needed is the "new norm" as so nobody will sign up to 2-3 days.
 

Lord Tyrion

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WFH has been brutal to the younger workforce. Their lack of experience of an office is not going to help. We saw it have a lot of down side for the young esp those who live in London and are suddenly forced to WFH in small london flats along with their partners. The oldies dont want to go in. Tomorrow, I have a large client meeting in London where we have people from various parts of the country + Europe jetting it. Spend the day in a room in London office. It will be like 2018 all over again.. Cant Wait
My son will be starting his first job, graduate trainee, in Bristol in September. He will have limited work level experience, knows no one in the city. He will be in the workplace, either office or on site, and is hoping there will be plenty of others doing the same. If the bulk are working from home........:eek:
 

Lilyhawk

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I understand the sentiment of wanting people back in the office to get the cities back to life. However, for me, if I had to go back in 5 days a week the only ones who’d get any extra money again would be the train line as there’s no way I could/would spend any money in the city. Travel alone would come to £400 a month, meaning I’d go in to work and straight back home. As it is now, going in 1-2 days a week, I do occasionally stay for a few drinks, going to a restaurant etc. That won’t happen if going back to “normal” as that money would be spent on the travel itself.
 

Reemul

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I live 2 minutes from my office, I can wfh 2 or 3 days a week if I want. 90% of the office work from home at least 3 days a week, a few only come in for 1 day. I like the office environment but most of the time I am in the office on my own and might as well be at home for all the interaction I get.

I work with someone who is a skiver, he is generally behind with his work and likes to wfh on busy days or Monday's and Friday's. However when he is in the office he is in the toilet for 30 mins a time (normally twice) and wandering around the office or on his mobile and not actually getting on with it.

We are managed centrally and he needs managing directly which does not happen, wfh or in the office he isn't interested.

Also my company is in many ways to blame for the poor performance of some and wfh.

Another colleague had a baby and now only comes in the office once a week as she needs to be at home with the child, now she is pregnant again and is apparently going to work from home permanently. Personally I do not understand how you can work from home and look after 2 kids under 3 at the same time, I could not have done my job well or properly. But the managers seem to lack the balls to actually stop it happening and this is the stuff that gives the anti wfh all the ammunition they need.

I have always been self motivated and hard working so where I work really doesn't matter
 

pauljames87

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I live 2 minutes from my office, I can wfh 2 or 3 days a week if I want. 90% of the office work from home at least 3 days a week, a few only come in for 1 day. I like the office environment but most of the time I am in the office on my own and might as well be at home for all the interaction I get.

I work with someone who is a skiver, he is generally behind with his work and likes to wfh on busy days or Monday's and Friday's. However when he is in the office he is in the toilet for 30 mins a time (normally twice) and wandering around the office or on his mobile and not actually getting on with it.

We are managed centrally and he needs managing directly which does not happen, wfh or in the office he isn't interested.

Also my company is in many ways to blame for the poor performance of some and wfh.

Another colleague had a baby and now only comes in the office once a week as she needs to be at home with the child, now she is pregnant again and is apparently going to work from home permanently. Personally I do not understand how you can work from home and look after 2 kids under 3 at the same time, I could not have done my job well or properly. But the managers seem to lack the balls to actually stop it happening and this is the stuff that gives the anti wfh all the ammunition they need.

I have always been self motivated and hard working so where I work really doesn't matter
I know my friend who works from home with a child sends her daughter to childminder twice a week to help her work, and those days she doesn't need to send to childminder as long as no commute

She will work when her daughter naps and after bedtime rather than 9-5 set
 
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Mudball

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I know my friend who works from home with a child sends her daughter to childminder twice a week to help her work, and those days she doesn't need to send to childminder as long as no commute

She will work when her daughter naps and after bedtime rather than 9-5 set
People will make arrangements based on circumstances and motivation.. a colleague used to start work at 6:30.. stop for school runs and then she would finish at 3:30 when her daughter was due back from school.. so it is possible.

Having said that I agree with @Reemul ’s point.. having 2 under 3 does not lend well to wfh. Though it will depend on nature of job.
 
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Mudball

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Political posts will be removed and the perps infracted
Tbh.. not sure how it is political to point out that the person instigating the end of wfh is being called up. He may be a politician but he is relevant to the conversation. Please look at context.

Otherwise post like saying an MP had been accused of doing something nasty will be deemed political too

Just my 2c
 
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