Golf with a Stoma (no banter please)

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spongebob59

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I was hoping that my thread had ended but due to various complications I will be having further surgery later this year and will be getting a permanent (end) colostomy.

It's been difficult to watch a year that started with such hope slide by and although physically fit I've been unable to play the sport I love and miss out on events such as the Open which was on my doorstep.

This really is the last roll of the dice but there are a few players at the club who have permanent stomas and I have coped well with a temporary one for 18 months.

So wish me luck as I wait for my surgery and hopeful to be back on the course next year 👍
 

DannyOT

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I was hoping that my thread had ended but due to various complications I will be having further surgery later this year and will be getting a permanent (end) colostomy.

It's been difficult to watch a year that started with such hope slide by and although physically fit I've been unable to play the sport I love and miss out on events such as the Open which was on my doorstep.

This really is the last roll of the dice but there are a few players at the club who have permanent stomas and I have coped well with a temporary one for 18 months.

So wish me luck as I wait for my surgery and hopeful to be back on the course next year 👍
Sorry to hear about the complications spongebob.

It seems more common than I originally thought for people to have trouble after reversal for various reasons unfortunately.

I hope the surgery gives you the ability to enjoy a round again.

I've had my end ileostomy for 18 months now and I can manage a full 18 holes if I eat a little less for the 12 hours before. I'd imagine a colostomy may be a little less 'constant' and you will be able to get out and play once you've recovered.
 

IanM

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My mum lived with an ileostomy for 14 years. She was very self conscious about it until she accepted that it was the difference between seeing her grandchildren grow up ot not.

She was very careful about what she ate and got into a management routine.

I think the mantra was "find what works best for you " and carry on.
 

Tashyboy

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I was hoping that my thread had ended but due to various complications I will be having further surgery later this year and will be getting a permanent (end) colostomy.

It's been difficult to watch a year that started with such hope slide by and although physically fit I've been unable to play the sport I love and miss out on events such as the Open which was on my doorstep.

This really is the last roll of the dice but there are a few players at the club who have permanent stomas and I have coped well with a temporary one for 18 months.

So wish me luck as I wait for my surgery and hopeful to be back on the course next year 👍
A couple of the lads I knew at work that had stomas ( after they had finished) were worried about the “stigma” that was attached. They worried about the impact it would have on there lives. I was fortunate that as Missis T worked in urology outreach, she knew and worked alongside the stoma care nurses that went out to people’s homes. They were very good. As it transpired, a vast majority those that had Stomas fitted went on to have better lives. They were not so confined to there homes.
SB, for me the priority is getting yourself well with a goal of slowly getting back to playing golf. It’s the golf that may well help you mentally as well as physically. Good luck me man.
 
Thread starter #105

spongebob59

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Sorry to hear about the complications spongebob.

It seems more common than I originally thought for people to have trouble after reversal for various reasons unfortunately.
I get the impression that the surgeons count the success in terms of surgery rather than how it is afterwards.
Certainly from my research there are more cases than you think.
If you have a lower resection there is more chance of running into problems and something called LARS where there is very little understanding of it and why it occurs in some and not others.
 

toyboy54

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I was hoping that my thread had ended but due to various complications I will be having further surgery later this year and will be getting a permanent (end) colostomy.

It's been difficult to watch a year that started with such hope slide by and although physically fit I've been unable to play the sport I love and miss out on events such as the Open which was on my doorstep.

This really is the last roll of the dice but there are a few players at the club who have permanent stomas and I have coped well with a temporary one for 18 months.

So wish me luck as I wait for my surgery and hopeful to be back on the course next year 👍
Spongebob59....Think that you can see/ guess that we're all with you in this(y)
Let's face it though, some of us seem to be succumbing the curse of the body letting us down...no matter what we do to stay fit/ diet/yoga etc:whistle:
Had my own case of TIA last week- which has buggered me up for a few weeks--BUT I WILL BE BACK ( just not carrying )
So my thoughts ( like ALL the others ) are with you in this fight-and it is a fight!
Be good, be careful-BE STRONG!!
 

DannyOT

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I get the impression that the surgeons count the success in terms of surgery rather than how it is afterwards.
Certainly from my research there are more cases than you think.
If you have a lower resection there is more chance of running into problems and something called LARS where there is very little understanding of it and why it occurs in some and not others.
I'm inclined to agree. It was predominantly LARS that I was thinking of regarding complications. As you say, it seems random as to who suffers from it.

I don't think quality of life 1, 2, 3+ is really in most surgeon's thoughts. I imagine 2 identical looking surgical results may end up in 2 completely different quality of life results, as there seems to be so many factors that determine the outcome. I never realised there are so many sensitive nerves and muscles near the rectum / sigmoid colon that can lead to numerous issues.
 
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