Coronavirus - how is it/has it affected you?

Billysboots

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I’ve been in this job nearly thirty years. Been to literally hundreds of incidents where police dogs have been deployed. And the only time they are let off the lead is to assist in the pursuit of a fleeing suspect and only then after very unambiguous warnings.

Never have I seen one set free into a crowd. Not once.
 
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I’ve been in this job nearly thirty years. Been to literally hundreds of incidents where police dogs have been deployed. And the only time they are let off the lead is to assist in the pursuit of a fleeing suspect and only then after very unambiguous warnings.

Never have I seen one set free into a crowd. Not once.
Oh OK, i stand corrected then, as you have never seen it happen it must never happen.
 

Billysboots

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BiM described what happens. At some point the police officer "tells" the dog to attack an individual. I described that as "setting the dogs on", a phrase you objected to. That seemed valid to me but since you objected to it I'm interested in how you would describe it. I'm not trying to catch you out, just genuinely interested. I'll let it drop if you don't want to answer.
Police dog handlers do not tell their dogs to attack anyone. So there is no phrase to attach to it. Can I be any clearer?
 
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Police dog handlers do not tell their dogs to attack anyone. So there is no phrase to attach to it. Can I be any clearer?
So was it a bobby that bit that woman in Bristol ? :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO: or was the dog just being friendly ....sorry, whether the dog was "set on her" or whatever phrase you do deem appropriate, the dog attacked her, disproving your statement that police dog handlers do not tell their dogs to attack anyone.
 
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Four miles too far!
Having read the BBC report and all the posts here two things immediately spring to mind.

Firstly I can find no reference in the report to the dog being let loose. Do we know that was the case or was the dog still on its leash and the miscreant may have got too close or even attempted to kick the dog?

After all the foot would not be a natural target for the animal.

Secondly the use of the word attack has been attributed to one poster by another yet I cannot find that reference.

There does seem to be a lot of assumptions being made and judgements then based on those assumptions.
 

Billysboots

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I think you need a "priceless" back at you for that obfuscation.
You seem intent on dragging this discussion out until I accept your suggestion that police dog handlers deliberately set out to injure people, deploying their dogs as a weapon.

Sorry, but you’re going to be disappointed.
 

Blue in Munich

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BiM described what happens. At some point the police officer "tells" the dog to attack an individual. I described that as "setting the dogs on", a phrase you objected to. That seemed valid to me but since you objected to it I'm interested in how you would describe it. I'm not trying to catch you out, just genuinely interested. I'll let it drop if you don't want to answer.
Sorry, where exactly did I say that an officer tells a dog to attack an individual? I referred to a dog being trained to act as necessary when released to chase a suspect, pointing out that if said suspect stopped then the dog is trained to circle and bark. I did not say that the officer would instruct a dog to attack an individual.
 

Billysboots

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So was it a bobby that bit that woman in Bristol ? :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO: or was the dog just being friendly ....sorry, whether the dog was "set on her" or whatever phrase you do deem appropriate, the dog attacked her, disproving your statement that police dog handlers do not tell their dogs to attack anyone.
As you’ve clearly no concept regarding how dogs behave, particularly police dogs, then I’m not going to engage with you any further.

You and I both only know what we’ve read in the press. But do you seriously think police dog handlers issue a verbal command to place their dogs into some sort of “attack mode”? Really?

I’ve seen first hand more than one person bitten by a police dog, including police officers. They don’t distinguish between police officers and anyone else (one of the reasons they’re not set loose into crowds), and not once have I heard the command “kill”, “dinner time Fido”, or anything else used to flick the canine switch to ensure they sink their teeth into the first thing that moves.

If you, or anyone else, think that’s how it works then this discussion has run its course.
 
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Jeez, what term would you use to describe the act of a dog biting someone causing such injuries, if not "attack"?
How about "defend" if the woman in question was trying to kick the dog.

I don't know what happened as, unlike some on here, I wasn't there and neither have I seen the video evidence.

Of course I am making assumptions there but it is the degree of certainty in some people's criticism of the police's actions that leads me to those assumptions.
 
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