Anyone a Trackman Expert?

Lee762

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Hi,

I have data from a recent session on trackman but to be honest I really do not know what Im looking at can anyone help.


Clubhead speed = 77mph (7 iron)
Launch angle = 22.8 degrees
launch direction = 1.2R
Carry = 127 yards
height = 78 ft
Land Angle = 47 degrees
Spin = 7060rpm
AoA= -2.2 degrees
Swing path = -10 degrees
Club face = 10 degrees

Really not sure how I can swing 10 degrees to the left and start the ball to the right.

Also the data is for range balls and even after I convert it the data stays the same. Range ball carried to the range marker at around 125yards, would using a normal ball result in different figures.
 

pendodave

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Hi,

I have data from a recent session on trackman but to be honest I really do not know what Im looking at can anyone help.


Clubhead speed = 77mph (7 iron)
Launch angle = 22.8 degrees
launch direction = 1.2R
Carry = 127 yards
height = 78 ft
Land Angle = 47 degrees
Spin = 7060rpm
AoA= -2.2 degrees
Swing path = -10 degrees
Club face = 10 degrees

Really not sure how I can swing 10 degrees to the left and start the ball to the right.

Also the data is for range balls and even after I convert it the data stays the same. Range ball carried to the range marker at around 125yards, would using a normal ball result in different figures.
Initial ball direction is mostly club face direction. True for putting too.
Look up "new ball flight laws" for a proper explanation
 

Smokey Lomcevak

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One way of visualising the point that pendodave makes is to change the frame of reference. If we imagine the club face is at rest in the position that you deliver it - I.e. same dynamic loft, lie and face angle, and imagine the ball meeting the club face at a velocity of 77mph, consider in which direction the ball would deflect.

The initial direction of the all is governed by dynamic loft (vertically - launch angle) and face angle (which in turn is affected by dynamic lie, giving start line). Of course they are also linked in that face angle can and will affect dynamic loft - the more open the face, the more dynamic loft.

What happens to the ball in flight is governed by the spin axis, which is the result of the above numbers and their relationship to the direction of travel of the club head - spin loft (vertically) and face-to-path (horizontally. These are essentially the same concepts, just rotated 90°. A large difference between face and path (or, indeed, dynamic loft and angle of attack) is more of a glancing blow, imparting spin on the ball.

In terms of diagnosing/rectifying isssues, it’s important to bear in mind what one is trying to do when the numbers are captured. One needs to know where the trackman is aiming, and one needs to decide if that is going to be where they intend to start the ball, or aim to finish the ball, with reference to their prevailing shot shape. If one is a fader, for example, the trackman should always be saying the path is to the left (RH) if one is trying to hit a target in line with the trackman aim, for example.

To figure out whether one’s club path is out to in relative to where they are aiming would require them to aim to start the ball on the line of the trackman. It would then yell whether one’s path is out to in or otherwise. In turn this could help with the decision about whether to try and tackle one’s club path, or simply try and get the face to line up, assuming the aim was to achieve a straighter, longer, more efficient ball flight.
 

Lee762

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One way of visualising the point that pendodave makes is to change the frame of reference. If we imagine the club face is at rest in the position that you deliver it - I.e. same dynamic loft, lie and face angle, and imagine the ball meeting the club face at a velocity of 77mph, consider in which direction the ball would deflect.

The initial direction of the all is governed by dynamic loft (vertically - launch angle) and face angle (which in turn is affected by dynamic lie, giving start line). Of course they are also linked in that face angle can and will affect dynamic loft - the more open the face, the more dynamic loft.

What happens to the ball in flight is governed by the spin axis, which is the result of the above numbers and their relationship to the direction of travel of the club head - spin loft (vertically) and face-to-path (horizontally. These are essentially the same concepts, just rotated 90°. A large difference between face and path (or, indeed, dynamic loft and angle of attack) is more of a glancing blow, imparting spin on the ball.

In terms of diagnosing/rectifying isssues, it’s important to bear in mind what one is trying to do when the numbers are captured. One needs to know where the trackman is aiming, and one needs to decide if that is going to be where they intend to start the ball, or aim to finish the ball, with reference to their prevailing shot shape. If one is a fader, for example, the trackman should always be saying the path is to the left (RH) if one is trying to hit a target in line with the trackman aim, for example.

To figure out whether one’s club path is out to in relative to where they are aiming would require them to aim to start the ball on the line of the trackman. It would then yell whether one’s path is out to in or otherwise. In turn this could help with the decision about whether to try and tackle one’s club path, or simply try and get the face to line up, assuming the aim was to achieve a straighter, longer, more efficient ball flight.
Smokey,

Thanks for the reply.

The aim is the big point. When I was in the bay I was given no aim point (my mistake I should have asked) therefore I cannot comfortably state that I was aiming in line with trackman.

In the other bays you select the target. This is where I was carrying the ball a full 20 yards further and the graphics and the flight showed a relatively straight flight.

They have suggested that I come back for a fitting, however based on the fact that they are fitting with range balls and there was such a massive discrepancy between what trackman was saying and what the ball was doing (both flight and distance) im not overly comfortable doing it.
 

Maninblack4612

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I don't think that aim is the important thing here, the discrepancy between swing path & face angle is the important one. If you manage to get the face angle & swingpath the same the ball will go straight. The direction it goes will be effectively, where you're aiming. If it goes consistently left or right just adjust your aim accordingly, there's not a problem doing that. A couple of years ago I was at a pro tournament, standing behind the tee at a par 3. The players' feet were pointing in every direction, some appearing to aim well left, others lining up well right. They all hit it pretty straight.

If your natural swingpath is to the left then all you need to do is to square the face, possibly a stronger grip, & aim right. Nothing wrong with that.
 
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