Utility Driving Irons v Hybrids

Neilds

Assistant Pro
Joined
Feb 25, 2014
Messages
3,454
Location
Wiltshire
Visit site
I have a bit of a love hate relationship with my hybrids (Callaway Rogue 3 and 5h). Most of the time they just stay in my bag, having a nice walk around the course in the sunshine. I try them on the range and the success rate is about 60-70% but then when I try on the course, most of the time it is a low hooky shot. My longest iron is a 5 and I hit this well (most of the time) so was considering trying a driving iron (or whatever they are called nowadays. The pro shop is looking at the demo stock and letting me use one next week (not sure what it will be) but was wondering if anyone else has swapped hybrids out of the bag? I am 19 handicap and 5i distance is about 165-175 so struggle on longer par 3s and 2nd shots to par 5s as I tend to be too short to attack the pin.
 

jim8flog

Journeyman Pro
Joined
May 20, 2017
Messages
14,543
Location
Yeovil
Visit site
The difference is all about the loft of the head in reality and what it is called.

There are probably a few around that think it is unmacho to have a rescue in the bag but a driving iron..........
 

jim8flog

Journeyman Pro
Joined
May 20, 2017
Messages
14,543
Location
Yeovil
Visit site
From another website


Is A Driving Iron Better Than A Hybrid?​

For the average golfer, a hybrid will be a better choice than a driving iron. Hybrids have a bigger sweet spot and don’t require as much speed to hit well. Hybrids are also more versatile since they can be hit from the fairway and rough.
 

Fabia999

Active member
Joined
Nov 29, 2018
Messages
411
Location
Sunderland
Visit site
Although Jim is right, the loft and usually shape of the head is a big difference. Another big difference for me is the swing speed required to get this airborne. I think the speed needed for a UDI is way more than a hybrid. If you have the speed I don't see a reason why you couldn't get one. At your handicap, it might be a struggle with them being not as forgiving as hybrids. Have you looked into 7 woods?
 

Captain_Black.

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 13, 2022
Messages
399
Visit site
I've had issues with hybrids in the past (low hooks etc) the cure for me was to play the ball further back in my stance & to use a lighter shaft.

A driving iron is a wonderful tool if you can hit it reliably, I have one ( no longer use it) as I found you really need a reasonably fast swing speed to launch it (which I don't)
 

RichA

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 24, 2021
Messages
3,063
Location
UK
Visit site
The older Ping G crossovers like the G400 are a good compromise. More forgiving than the more recent ones.
I replaced my G400 with a G410 and have regretted it.
 

Pin-seeker

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 10, 2012
Messages
13,726
Visit site
The older Ping G crossovers like the G400 are a good compromise. More forgiving than the more recent ones.
I replaced my G400 with a G410 and have regretted it.
I have the G400 & love it.
Only really use it on the tee or if the balls sat up nice in the 1st cut tho 😬
 
  • Like
Reactions: ADB

Orikoru

Tour Winner
Joined
Nov 1, 2016
Messages
24,802
Location
Watford
Visit site
I could see the benefit of a driving iron over hybrid on tee shots, as potentially be a bit less slicey or hooky (depending on your wont). But it would be so much harder to hit off the deck. Even more difficult again from the mid-rough, where hybrid is quite useful. I even chip with my hybrid on the odd occasion so you'd lose that benefit as well. All in all I'd say hybrid has a lot more benefits and more uses.

Not all hybrids are equal though, it's worth trying a few different ones out. You could certainly find one that feels more similar to a driving iron off the tee I should think. Several years ago I tried a TaylorMade GAPR for a while for example, and I think the newer version of that is called a DHY or something. They're sort of designed to be a cross between a hybrid and driving iron, and I'm sure other brands make something similar.
 

Lord Tyrion

Money List Winner
Moderator
Joined
Sep 9, 2014
Messages
26,357
Location
Northumberland
Visit site
My son has a TaylorMade GAPR. He uses it for tee shots on tight holes. He has a fast swing speed, is a good ball striker. He hits it like an exocet, dead straight. I've tried it multiple times, never hit the middle of the face, barely got it off the ground. I hit my PW further :LOL: .

As others have said, if you are a good ball striker, have decent swing speed then give one a go. If you are neither of these things then don't waste your money. They look great in the hands of a decent player. For the rest of us, they are just weight to carry around and you know the club is laughing at you from the bag.
 

garyinderry

Ryder Cup Winner
Joined
Jan 7, 2012
Messages
13,084
Visit site
I've very rarely seen a driving iron being used well by anyone with a handicap in the mid-teens or higher.

I've flirted with the idea of one this last few years. Over 10 shots the hybrid always wins out. I could hit a good one 220 and a poor one 180. That's not what I need.
 

Neilds

Assistant Pro
Joined
Feb 25, 2014
Messages
3,454
Location
Wiltshire
Visit site
There are quite a few sites that have reviews for driving irons for high handicappers so not sure if they are all hard to hit - Cobra, Mizuno and Ping all feature at the top of most of the lists. Will also have a look at a 7 wood as this may be the answer.
 

Orikoru

Tour Winner
Joined
Nov 1, 2016
Messages
24,802
Location
Watford
Visit site
There are quite a few sites that have reviews for driving irons for high handicappers so not sure if they are all hard to hit - Cobra, Mizuno and Ping all feature at the top of most of the lists. Will also have a look at a 7 wood as this may be the answer.
Can't say enough nice things about my 7 wood. It's very easy to hit. Nice easy 180-190 yards depending on conditions. Great for launching one out of the semi-rough too.
 

Orikoru

Tour Winner
Joined
Nov 1, 2016
Messages
24,802
Location
Watford
Visit site
That is just the kind of distance I am looking for. What make/model do you have?
Cobra F9. I have the 5 wood and the 7 wood - both set 1 degree stronger (17.5 and 21.5) and on 'draw' setting. They are probably among the oldest clubs in my bag now, I love them because they have the two rails on the sole that stop the club digging into the turf if you're a bit steep. They do say if you find a fairway wood that works, stick with it through thick and thin, and I am loath to ever change them!
 

Backsticks

Assistant Pro
Joined
Aug 7, 2012
Messages
3,582
Visit site
The difference is all about the loft of the head in reality and what it is called.

There are probably a few around that think it is unmacho to have a rescue in the bag but a driving iron..........
Driving iron for anyone not better than scratch = vanity delusion.
 

Jigger

Club Champion
Joined
Aug 25, 2009
Messages
1,760
Visit site
I've had issues with hybrids in the past (low hooks etc) the cure for me was to play the ball further back in my stance & to use a lighter shaft.
The concept of having the hybrid further back in the stance is apparently the big reason why people struggle with them. They’re great when you get them right but with them looking more like a wood, I do tend to let them slide forwards on occasion.
 

SteveW86

Head Pro
Joined
Jan 10, 2016
Messages
3,239
Location
Southampton
Visit site
Ive got a driving iron (3) and then a hybrid and also the now famous 7 wood. All have their uses depending on the course and condition. I only use the driving iron off the tee, on maybe 2 holes at our place. The hybrid and 7 wood are great for a high flight and stopping quickly on the greens.

Ive found that I can hit any club in the bag as badly as the 3 iron
 

Curls

Journeyman Pro
Joined
Mar 25, 2011
Messages
3,265
Visit site
I could be wrong, but I think a big part of peoples problems with driving irons is that they think they have to hit them differently to their irons. Played with a guy who was always trying to flight it down - even on a calm day. When there’s plenty run on the fairways and especially if you play a links, they’re a great option. There’s so much meat in the head and a springy face they only need to be decently struck to get a nice straight runner out there. Into the wind, and if you can hit a reasonable punch shot, mine has gone as far as well struck drivers with none of the associated risk of mayhem.

If you can hit a good 5 iron off a tee peg, try one out and when you’re standing over it, pretend it’s your 5 iron. You might be surprised by how far it goes. If you don’t get on with hybrids and you’ve a big swing Fade or Draw with long irons, you’re probably better off with a 5 or 7 wood or something.
 

Neilds

Assistant Pro
Joined
Feb 25, 2014
Messages
3,454
Location
Wiltshire
Visit site
I could be wrong, but I think a big part of peoples problems with driving irons is that they think they have to hit them differently to their irons. Played with a guy who was always trying to flight it down - even on a calm day. When there’s plenty run on the fairways and especially if you play a links, they’re a great option. There’s so much meat in the head and a springy face they only need to be decently struck to get a nice straight runner out there. Into the wind, and if you can hit a reasonable punch shot, mine has gone as far as well struck drivers with none of the associated risk of mayhem.

If you can hit a good 5 iron off a tee peg, try one out and when you’re standing over it, pretend it’s your 5 iron. You might be surprised by how far it goes. If you don’t get on with hybrids and you’ve a big swing Fade or Draw with long irons, you’re probably better off with a 5 or 7 wood or something.
Thanks for this. My 5i off the tee is nice and straight so will give it a go
 
Top