The Clock Method of wedge play

Ye Olde Boomer

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First came the lob wedge with more loft and less bounce than the sand iron.

Around the same time, lofts started getting stronger and a "gap wedge" became required between the pitching wedge and sand iron.

Then lofts got even stronger so the pitching wedge and gap wedge became equivalent to 8 and 9-irons, not one but two clubs strong.

So now, I've got wedges in my bag set at 44, 49, 54, and 58º plus a sand iron set at 64º.

The 44 and 49 are no bother as they're just very slightly weak 8 and 9-irons from when I started out in the early 1960s.

The 54 and 58 are definitely turf wedges, however, and the sand iron can conceivably be hit from the turf as well. It has a wider sole than I'd like from turf, but no bounce when the face is square.

The plan, when multiple wedges became common, then, was the "clock method." Record a matrix of distances with how far you hit each wedge with half, three-quarter, and full swings.

Well first of all, this resulted in loft overlaps. Second, it required far more practice time than I was willing to devote.

I was forced to discover an alternate short-game strategy for multiple wedges.

I finally settled on something. I now use the FORCE to guide me on which wedge to hit and how hard to hit it.

Much simpler than the "clock method."
 

duncan mackie

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The force is just experience (practice or play) applied.

The risk associated with this approach tends to be decelerating as the subconcious makes a last minute adjustment.
 

HomerJSimpson

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I tried the clock method (Dave Pelz). I found no issues in loft overlaps or distance gaps. The biggest issue and the reason I stopped using it was I felt it was too mechanical and took away whatever "feel" I had.
 

clubchamp98

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I use this method but only with one club.
I use the 50* gap wedge for all my shots from 110 yds in.
Only time I deviate is over bunkers or chip and run shots.
 

Ye Olde Boomer

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The force is just experience (practice or play) applied.

The risk associated with this approach tends to be decelerating as the subconcious makes a last minute adjustment.


I tried the clock method (Dave Pelz). I found no issues in loft overlaps or distance gaps. The biggest issue and the reason I stopped using it was I felt it was too mechanical and took away whatever "feel" I had.

Decelerating is deadly in any golf swing. I've worked hard to eliminate that.
Feel is important in the short game. I don't know whether or not the Pelz system detracts from it because I didn't stay with it long enough.
 
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Ye Olde Boomer

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I thought that The Force was an energy field created by all living things that surrounds us and penetrates us and binds the galaxy together.
Not something I'd feel comfortable trying to harness in my golf swing.

I can't imagine anything more appropriate than the golf swing for using the Force.
Although it served me well when I was young and stupid enough to drink and drive.
Very young. Very stupid.
 
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