Coronavirus - how is it/has it affected you?

SocketRocket

Ryder Cup Winner
Joined
Sep 12, 2011
Messages
16,867
A bloke I work with claims that the Covid virus is just one "big experiment" and come 2023 when "the experiment" ends then we'll see.:eek:
He doesn't need to be vaccinated either, even though he has Diabetes, is overweight and smokes!o_O
He's done loads of research though, on Fakebook!:rolleyes:
I asked him if he thought the Earth was flat but he said, "no I don't think so":oops:
There are some prize plums out there who believe everything on Fakebook and will deny what is good for them.
A relative of ours warned us not to wear a mask as it caused Carbon dioxide poisoning.
 

SocketRocket

Ryder Cup Winner
Joined
Sep 12, 2011
Messages
16,867
Looking at the BBCs national Covid map I notice that infection rates are tending to be lower in the major conurbations and very high in some more rural areas. London and Birmingham are relatively low. Tewkesbury for example has gone from the lowest in the country to one of the highest in the last two weeks.
 

Swinglowandslow

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 19, 2018
Messages
2,143
Looking at the BBCs national Covid map I notice that infection rates are tending to be lower in the major conurbations and very high in some more rural areas. London and Birmingham are relatively low. Tewkesbury for example has gone from the lowest in the country to one of the highest in the last two weeks.
I wonder why. You'd think not, but, like everything, there's always a reason.....somewhere.
Could it be that the folks in the cities are declining to be tested for some reason? If positive they have to stop work? Is there now no income for them as a result?
Easy to say they should isolate etc , but there are many low paid in cities who have to take hard decisions, maybe.?
In the rural spots, easier to isolate re income - large proportion of retired etc and thus a lot more likely to get tested .
This is pure speculation, but if the figures are being crunched properly, there must be a reason .
 

SocketRocket

Ryder Cup Winner
Joined
Sep 12, 2011
Messages
16,867
I wonder why. You'd think not, but, like everything, there's always a reason.....somewhere.
Could it be that the folks in the cities are declining to be tested for some reason? If positive they have to stop work? Is there now no income for them as a result?
Easy to say they should isolate etc , but there are many low paid in cities who have to take hard decisions, maybe.?
In the rural spots, easier to isolate re income - large proportion of retired etc and thus a lot more likely to get tested .
This is pure speculation, but if the figures are being crunched properly, there must be a reason .
Most cases seem to be young people/school children.
 

SocketRocket

Ryder Cup Winner
Joined
Sep 12, 2011
Messages
16,867
A family member working in the NHS reckons that 90% of those in hospital are unvaccinated. More concerningly, a number of those are refusing treatment because they don't believe Covid exists or don't trust the treatments.
I can believe it. I was posting about infection cases per 100k in the BBC Covid map, most big cities seem to have the lowest number of cases and most cases are in the lower age demographic. Obviously there must be a reason for this but I just can't see it right now.
 
Thread starter #21,687

drdel

Tour Rookie
Joined
Aug 28, 2013
Messages
4,071
A family member working in the NHS reckons that 90% of those in hospital are unvaccinated. More concerningly, a number of those are refusing treatment because they don't believe Covid exists or don't trust the treatments.
It's certainly worrying when even some NHS staff won't get jabbed and are kicking up a fuss at being told to get vaccinated.
 

Billysboots

Challenge Tour Pro
Joined
Aug 25, 2009
Messages
2,082
Are they front line NHS staff ??
How many work in the office and never see a patient
Even if they are office staff there is a risk they will bring Covid into hospitals and that is why it is a problem.

I had major surgery a few weeks ago, and the hospital wanted me out 24 hours later, not because I was ready, nor because they wanted the bed space. The reason, the nursing staff told me, is that hospitals are now encouraged to discharge patients ASAP before they contract infection, primarily Covid.

In the end I had to stop a second night because I was in such pain. There was no way I could have tolerated getting in and out of a car and the journey home.

I can totally understand why all NHS hospital staff, regardless of role, should be fully vaccinated.
 

Dannyc

Active member
Joined
Oct 27, 2018
Messages
224
Even if they are office staff there is a risk they will bring Covid into hospitals and that is why it is a problem.

I had major surgery a few weeks ago, and the hospital wanted me out 24 hours later, not because I was ready, nor because they wanted the bed space. The reason, the nursing staff told me, is that hospitals are now encouraged to discharge patients ASAP before they contract infection, primarily Covid.

In the end I had to stop a second night because I was in such pain. There was no way I could have tolerated getting in and out of a car and the journey home.

I can totally understand why all NHS hospital staff, regardless of role, should be fully vaccinated.
I’m not disagreeing
I’m double jabbed and currently sitting at home recovering from Covid
If it’s stopped me becoming seriously ill then thank u very much but it ain’t stopped me getting it or passing it on
 

chellie

Tour Winner
Joined
Mar 23, 2013
Messages
3,938
Even if they are office staff there is a risk they will bring Covid into hospitals and that is why it is a problem.

I had major surgery a few weeks ago, and the hospital wanted me out 24 hours later, not because I was ready, nor because they wanted the bed space. The reason, the nursing staff told me, is that hospitals are now encouraged to discharge patients ASAP before they contract infection, primarily Covid.

In the end I had to stop a second night because I was in such pain. There was no way I could have tolerated getting in and out of a car and the journey home.

I can totally understand why all NHS hospital staff, regardless of role, should be fully vaccinated.
Used to be the same but for MRSA.
 

Billysboots

Challenge Tour Pro
Joined
Aug 25, 2009
Messages
2,082
Ah, you hardly hear MRSA mentioned now.
I’d forgotten about it pretty much until my admission, when they realised that I’d swabbed positive for it 20-odd years ago and because they didn’t have time to re-swab me they had to find me my own room. So it’s not all bad 😇
 

GB72

Money List Winner
Joined
May 8, 2007
Messages
11,838
Location
Rutland
Purely guesswork but living in a rural area I can see why there can be higher rates. Some see this as an urban thing, far safer in the countries. Then you have the fact that all the kids go to school on one bus, all the adults drink in one pub, people see people every day. One person gets it in a village and it spreads. Think half of the under 15s in my village a contracted it last week at the same time going by the number of people I know who were isolating due to one or all of their kids getting it
 

fundy

Ryder Cup Winner
Joined
Aug 6, 2010
Messages
22,616
Location
Herts/Beds border
Purely guesswork but living in a rural area I can see why there can be higher rates. Some see this as an urban thing, far safer in the countries. Then you have the fact that all the kids go to school on one bus, all the adults drink in one pub, people see people every day. One person gets it in a village and it spreads. Think half of the under 15s in my village a contracted it last week at the same time going by the number of people I know who were isolating due to one or all of their kids getting it

Counter guesswork; The urban high density cities suffered much worse with it in the first 2 waves and thus there is far higher immunity to it this time round compared to people in villages who found it far easier to stay isolated before but have not bothered as much this time round

That or its just a viral illness that comes and goes in different areas which would explain the vast difference in success between different areas/countries etc with different rules and restrictions at different times contrary to what at times would be expected
 
Joined
Jun 22, 2015
Messages
1,513
I’d forgotten about it pretty much until my admission, when they realised that I’d swabbed positive for it 20-odd years ago and because they didn’t have time to re-swab me they had to find me my own room. So it’s not all bad 😇
Sounds like you was lucky with it, a contractor at work struggles to walk, one day I asked what’s up with his leg and he pulled up his trousers and peeled back his bandage to reveal a puss leaking zombified leg that looked like pirhanas had a nibble to his bone

Sore leg and sore subject but caught it at hospital and they’re refusing to pay out.
 
Top