Working in golf industry seems like such a dead end .

Wabinez

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It depends what you want to get out of it. The guy I have lessons with loves giving lessons, using the technology available to him and helping people improve. I know a couple of pros like it...
He knows he isn't going to win a ton of cash playing pro-ams and he knows he isnt going to make it to the European Tour/Challenge Tour etc...but is in it for the teaching and improvement aspect.
 

duncan mackie

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There are an increasing number of lifestyle occupations; many in the leisure industry, but not all.

The decision as to whether to earn the money to live and fund your chosen interest or work in that interest is one that this generation has more choice in that any before.

Where some see a dead end others see satisfaction.

Other obvious examples include diving, sailing, flying, but don't rule out cooking, and aspects of many other skills (woodwork, metalwork and most arts).

Put another way, it's not a golf issue.
 

HomerJSimpson

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We had the same pro for many years and he left this year. The only down side was the new pro wanted his own staff and the existing assistant pro had to go. He had worked hard to build a great reputation as a teacher not just with our members (and has been off doing stuff with the ET and Europr tour). The new pro and his assistant are working hard and have already regenerated the junior academy and spread it out into a couple of schools.

It can be hard work and long hours for little reward at times. I had a brief taste in the 80's and maybe as I was young and innocent I enjoyed it. The sentence "getting out what you put in" is very apt but I think you need the input from someone like Bob to give a realistic inside account. Of course there are many other avenues to pursue
 

shivas irons

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I was talking to an assistant pro this week who is applying for jobs outside golf,min wage and 30 hrs a week for somebody starting a family is diabolical and the trouble is these assistants can be at a club for years before they are promoted to head pro on that dire income.
 
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harpo_72

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I looked at it after I finished my engineering degree, was a bit miffed with the engineering. Played golf and did a couple of post grads as well. Got to 4 and held a course record or two. Thought I would look into the PGA course stuff. They had no respect for my education and wanted me to follow their course and not fast track through. Yeah sounds like I am arrogant because I was asking for fast tracking but their course was designed to build on kids who had left school early etc...
I only wanted to teach and spend time on the course, the open air was for me. However 3 years in a pro shop selling mars bars lost its appeal. So I went and got my first contract at Dagenham on 3 x the assistant wages. At 25 I had to get earning!
I totally understand the moving on.
 

Superstriker

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Life is about being happy. I knew a gentleman that worked in the industry for 30 years making minimum wage.He lived in a camper in the parking lot.Great player
 

selwood90

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It's one of those things. The chances of making it are few and far between. But I agree with the satisfaction comment, I don't know what they earn or what is the average for a teaching professional or assistant pro. But you can be working 30 hours a week, doing something you hate, for say 1200 quid a month. Why not do something you enjoy for 1200 quid a month? They surely arnt earning any less than that. I know the flip side of the argument will be the long hours they do for that money. But it's something they are interested in and let's face it is part and parcel of the job. I'm sure alot of these guys know what they are getting themselves in for. But I agree, it's probably nowhere near as good as your average amateur golfer thinks it is.
 

Superstriker

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It's one of those things. The chances of making it are few and far between. But I agree with the satisfaction comment, I don't know what they earn or what is the average for a teaching professional or assistant pro. But you can be working 30 hours a week, doing something you hate, for say 1200 quid a month. Why not do something you enjoy for 1200 quid a month? They surely arnt earning any less than that. I know the flip side of the argument will be the long hours they do for that money. But it's something they are interested in and let's face it is part and parcel of the job. I'm sure alot of these guys know what they are getting themselves in for. But I agree, it's probably nowhere near as good as your average amateur golfer thinks it is.
They have to live in a camper by the river
 

backwoodsman

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Spending so much of my time thru the years on so many courses observing the industry.Really notice a trend of how high the turn around is in this industry.I always feel so bad for all the gals and guys that admit to make a mark for themselves in this career choice.Except for a very select few ; most if not all never make it.Low pay/long hours and rarely any benefits such as pension - health insurance - 401 k.Imho , why does a course really need a pro or assistant pro? You can get the same attention from hiring non golf minded shop managers and college shop students.Why not have a roving teacher - club fitter who has a course territory of several clubs ?

what a dead end job. Agree - disagree ?

Honestly :/ it doesn't take a lot to run a golf tourney at the club.And I'm sure vendors will be more than happy to setup displays in pro shops.No need for a pro at all in the club industry.The teacher / club fitter / cart repair can all be on contract to service a few courses. No need for all of this excess over head

Anyone that has these big aspirations of being a tour pro needs to be biatch slapped.What a far fetched idea.Any lads that get in the industry for that reason need a reality check.Best Any can do is find a career that allows you to be a member at the club.Not a worker at it

It's dead end . Don't sugar coat it folks

Life is about being happy. I knew a gentleman that worked in the industry for 30 years making minimum wage.He lived in a camper in the parking lot.Great player

They have to live in a camper by the river

Someone got out of bed the wrong side l fear. Come on, open up and get it off your chest ...
 

mikejohnchapman

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Maybe he has a point- maybe they should lower the scoring criteria to scratch? Less pros = less saturation = higher wages.... Someone else commented on the test that over 2 rounds it only needs to be 15 over or less? Surely not?!?

If you are trying to get the PGA to turn our tour pros then fine. Thebest players don't always make the best coaches - look at football.
 

mikejohnchapman

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I think the way forward is for pros who don't want to earn money from competing to become course managers. We have a pro at our course that does this and he is responsible for the day to day working at the club.
 

Superstriker

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I guess some think having an pro that is a great player is a necessity.For me I can care less if Jack Nicklaus is behind the counter or joe blow.As long as my clubs are on the cart when I'm ready to play is all that matters to me
 

Mike07

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Just to add to the interesting thread, one problem I see is that the golf industry is very insula. Club managers and pros rarely learn or work in any other industries so there is very little opportunity to move it forward.

An assistant pro will only learn from the head pro, who in turn learnt from the older pro who is now retired. Same things going round and round with no industry ptogresssion. This is so true for how golf clubs are run too.

"We do it this way as that's the tradition and what we've always done..." - far too common

We need to get people from other industries, private sector, more involved with managing clubs and running them. Sadly the industry doesn't pay well so will never attract the best people
 

Superstriker

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Just to add to the interesting thread, one problem I see is that the golf industry is very insula. Club managers and pros rarely learn or work in any other industries so there is very little opportunity to move it forward.

An assistant pro will only learn from the head pro, who in turn learnt from the older pro who is now retired. Same things going round and round with no industry ptogresssion. This is so true for how golf clubs are run too.

"We do it this way as that's the tradition and what we've always done..." - far too common

We need to get people from other industries, private sector, more involved with managing clubs and running them. Sadly the industry doesn't pay well so will never attract the best people
Thanks Mike.And none this vibe is against you.Maybe you need to all ban together and form union and get a standardized wage and health packages/retirement/investment.This industry needs an awakening or a mass walk out to see some changes
 

shivas irons

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I guess some think having an pro that is a great player is a necessity.For me I can care less if Jack Nicklaus is behind the counter or joe blow.As long as my clubs are on the cart when I'm ready to play is all that matters to me
Agree,when I worked for AG out of 6 sales staff I had the highest HC but was regulary second on sales,3 even were PGA,its sales skills not golf skills that make a good salesman.
 

Mike07

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Thanks Mike.And none this vibe is against you.Maybe you need to all ban together and form union and get a standardized wage and health packages/retirement/investment.This industry needs an awakening or a mass walk out to see some changes

The industry is stuck in the dark ages.

I don't work in the golf industry (thankfully), but like everyone on here, love the game
 
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