Identifying Your Ball On The First Tee

Swango1980

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It is a matter of what is meant by identification. It is insufficient for the player to have the ball identified to his satisfaction. Others(pups) must be able to be satisfied.
I,e. No good the player saying - it is a Srixon 1.
There are many Srixon 1s. Some of which are laying around golf courses. Lost.

However, saying you are playing with a Srixon with two red dots at the end of the name on the ball, would be good identification. That can be seen to be the case ( or otherwise, )by other players.

Social golf, who cares?
Competition- it matters.
See the final bullet point in Rule 7.2. There is no requirement for a player to put any markings on the ball under the rules. A ball is identified if a ball is found that is the same brand, number and condition as the players ball. This will only back fire on the player if 2 identical balls are found.

So, it is recommended to put markings on it, but not necessary under the rules.
 

rulefan

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See the final bullet point in Rule 7.2. There is no requirement for a player to put any markings on the ball under the rules. A ball is identified if a ball is found that is the same brand, number and condition as the players ball. This will only back fire on the player if 2 identical balls are found.

So, it is recommended to put markings on it, but not necessary under the rules.
A player’s ball at rest may be identified in any one of these ways:

  • By the player or anyone else seeing a ball come to rest in circumstances where it is known to be the player’s ball.
  • By seeing the player’s identifying mark on the ball (see Rule 6.3a).
  • By finding a ball with the same brand, model, number and condition as the player’s ball in an area where the player’s ball is expected to be (but this does not apply if an identical ball is in the same area and there is no way to know which one is the player’s ball).
If a player’s provisional ball cannot be distinguished from his or her original ball, see Rule 18.3c(2).


 

Swango1980

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A player’s ball at rest may be identified in any one of these ways:

  • By the player or anyone else seeing a ball come to rest in circumstances where it is known to be the player’s ball.
  • By seeing the player’s identifying mark on the ball (see Rule 6.3a).
  • By finding a ball with the same brand, model, number and condition as the player’s ball in an area where the player’s ball is expected to be (but this does not apply if an identical ball is in the same area and there is no way to know which one is the player’s ball).
If a player’s provisional ball cannot be distinguished from his or her original ball, see Rule 18.3c(2).


Appreciate that, but I wasn't responding to the provisional ball issue. Simply the markings on a ball issue.
 

Colin L

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It is insufficient for the player to have the ball identified to his satisfaction. Others(pups) must be able to be satisfied.
I,e. No good the player saying - it is a Srixon 1.......
.
I can't really soften this. That's entirely wrong. :)

Putting an identification mark on your ball is a recommendation not a requirement..
The player should put an identifying mark on the ball to be played [Rule 6.3a]

No-one else has to be satisfied that a player can identify his or her own ball. That's the player's responsibility.

It is fine for a player to say it's a Srixon 1, not least because there's no requirement to say anything.
 

Swinglowandslow

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See the final bullet point in Rule 7.2. There is no requirement for a player to put any markings on the ball under the rules. A ball is identified if a ball is found that is the same brand, number and condition as the players ball. This will only back fire on the player if 2 identical balls are found.

So, it is recommended to put markings on it, but not necessary under the rules.
I stand corrected by this and Rulefan and Colin.
As you say, the final bullet point says so.
My view was influenced by an example I saw given as a decision in the rules many years ago where two players playing adjacent fairways hit their balls, one rightish, the other also rightish and both balls came to rest very near each other. Both balls were same make, same number, and both golfers couldn't say which was theirs because of that.
The decision was that both players had lost their balls.
That would fit with the final bullet point, I suppose. ( though it wouldn't be too hard to claim a different "condition "😉)
As a pure personal opinion, I think the rulemakers would have made things easier by requiring a personal marking of the ball.
 

rulefan

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As a pure personal opinion, I think the rulemakers would have made things easier by requiring a personal marking of the ball.
The problem with that is deciding just what is 'personal'. When acting as a starter I find so many players saying their unique marking is two red (or black) dots under the ProV1 logo.
And more often than not it's two of the three waiting to tee off. If I suggest initials, they look at me blank. 'Huh' is the response. My wife puts JH and an odd hierographic on hers because there at least 4 JHs in the club.
 

Colin L

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I stand corrected by this and Rulefan and Colin.
As you say, the final bullet point says so.
My view was influenced by an example I saw given as a decision in the rules many years ago where two players playing adjacent fairways hit their balls, one rightish, the other also rightish and both balls came to rest very near each other. Both balls were same make, same number, and both golfers couldn't say which was theirs because of that.
The decision was that both players had lost their balls.
That would fit with the final bullet point, I suppose. ( though it wouldn't be too hard to claim a different "condition "😉)
As a pure personal opinion, I think the rulemakers would have made things easier by requiring a personal marking of the ball.
I think you've understandably turned what is good practice into a rules requirement in your mind, that's all.
 

clubchamp98

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I stand corrected by this and Rulefan and Colin.
As you say, the final bullet point says so.
My view was influenced by an example I saw given as a decision in the rules many years ago where two players playing adjacent fairways hit their balls, one rightish, the other also rightish and both balls came to rest very near each other. Both balls were same make, same number, and both golfers couldn't say which was theirs because of that.
The decision was that both players had lost their balls.
That would fit with the final bullet point, I suppose. ( though it wouldn't be too hard to claim a different "condition "😉)
As a pure personal opinion, I think the rulemakers would have made things easier by requiring a personal marking of the ball.
In this scenario if one player had just said” that’s mine I am 100% sure”
Does he have to explain why or is that it.

There might be a minor imperfection or mark on the ball and he could just point it out.
Could anyone question his claim? I am sure the other player would not.
 

IanM

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As it is such good practice to mark your ball in an identifiable way.... why don't they make it a rule, rather than a suggestion?

20 years ago I played the wrong ball in the County Foursomes. Never been on a course without a properly marked ball since. I buy new balls, I mark the whole batch as soon as I get them!!

I could even tell you how my regular 4 ball mark theirs. It's just sensible.

I wonder what the objection is?
 

SammmeBee

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As it is such good practice to mark your ball in an identifiable way.... why don't they make it a rule, rather than a suggestion?

20 years ago I played the wrong ball in the County Foursomes. Never been on a course without a properly marked ball since. I buy new balls, I mark the whole batch as soon as I get them!!

I could even tell you how my regular 4 ball mark theirs. It's just sensible.

I wonder what the objection is?
What happens if you don’t in those circumstances…..?
 

Neilds

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Mark your ball I think he means.
Makeing it a rule means you would get a penalty if you forgot.
Imagine being DQd for not marking your ball.

But I agree it just makes sense to!
But if everyone identified their ball on the tee, you would soon realise you didn't have any markings and it wouldn't take too long to rectify. Some people just like to make barriers when there really aren't any ;)
 

clubchamp98

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But if everyone identified their ball on the tee, you would soon realise you didn't have any markings and it wouldn't take too long to rectify. Some people just like to make barriers when there really aren't any ;)
I got some Pro v1 with 57 on them
That’s a great idea as most OEMs only go up to 4.
Making the numbers up to 100 would be a good idea.
Although some superstitious might not like high numbers.
 

IanM

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I ordered the 4 boxes for price of 3 from my Pro ... all with my name on (at no extra charge) - and I could have had non-standard numbers for an extra tenner (I think)

Alternatively, Amazon will send you a lorry load of "Sharpie Pens" for "mere pennies".... so there is no excuse.
 

slicer79

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I often use a yellow ball. One thing I like is knowing my ball straight away as usually nobody else is playing yellow. Especially handy on blind tee shots
 
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