How to get the most out of golf whatever your age - your thoughts and tips please!

MikeH

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hi all

We are looking to produce a feature for a forthcoming issue on how to get the most out of golf, whatever your age

This will look at the natural advantages each decade offers and also then some tips to help make your golf even more enjoyable at each lifestage

We're keen to hear your experiences and, if you have any, your hints and tips for getting the most out of golf in each decade

Here are a few thoughts we've had at GM Towers

Why golf in this decade of your life is great…
In your 20s you have your peak fitness and no commitments, still have reduced membership fees but it's tough as you don't have much spare cash
In your 30s you start to have a bit more disposable cash, can play better courses but probably have less time due to family and work commitments
In your 40s you know your game, you learn to play within yourself, if you have kids then you get more perspective and realise that golf isn't the be-all-and-end-all, you start to be able to introduce/play golf with your kids. Perhaps it's the sport you can do and get into when you stop playing more demanding sports like football or rugby
In your 50s you begin to get more time, have fewer other commitments, can start playing in senior amateur events that you should be very competitive in given your relative youth in this bracket
In your 60s you have the chance to travel even more widely and modern golf equipment helps to counter the effect of ageing
In your 70s and above - it's just great that you can still play the sport you love!

Over to you - any thoughts very welcome!
 

dankiz

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just about to hit 50 this year. My tip to myself and other golfers of a similar age, just enjoy each moment on the course, treat the good and the bad with equal measure! i am very competitive but I am playing much better now that I have appreciated my limitations. Golf will win the majority of the time, no problem at all, it makes the good rounds so much sweeter. Won a society last week shooting 82, my best round in a year. Beautiful scenery and great designs, enjoy yourself and get your steps up, perfect.
 

Britishshooting

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I’m 29 and for me it’s a mix of disposable income and lack of responsibilities outside of work.

Fortunately due to intermediate membership options I can afford to be a member of 3 golf courses. One near home, one near work and one in between that I played as a junior and have a very good social connection with.

I can as a result in longer day light periods play golf before and after work, and at weekends around commitments with my partner.

I’m always in close proximity to a course and usually have my clubs in the boot.

When I was apprentice early 20’s I found it very difficult to play and packed it up as s result. Juggling work, university and deadlines for both meant I had very little personal time. I was also paid a pittance for the luxury of having my fees covered so golf membership at the time wasn’t high in my priorities and during this 4 year period I didn’t hit s ball.

So overall the decade between my 20-30’a for me contrasts enormously.
 

duncan mackie

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I can't answer truthfully for the previous decades as I wish to continue to be able to play now that I have the time and choice...but as with any pastime priorities can get very confused at times and you end up at the right place (1st tee) at the wrong time (when you are supposed to be heading to a baptism, lunch with the in-laws etc).
 

Wolf

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For me 20s is the hardest period to play, work commitments, learning and beginning a young family all puts paid to being able to fully enjoy the game.

30's I'm coming to the end of those soon (ish) slightly more disposable income but tighter time schedules due to kids bei g of an age now where more needs doing for them. So let is find the balance that allows time at the range or on course whilst still being there to help at home. Also helps to involve the kids so they can see the fun and join in with dad.

40s + when I get there it will be to make it more sociable than competitive. Enjoy time with friends in course and away days, involving the kids in junior golf and getting out to play with Dad.

Overall fitness is key we're in a game that can be played for a long time and help keep us healthier. Make the most of each round and encourage others to get out there to.
 

Crow

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Speaking for golf rather than myself:
The 20s - Hickory golf was at it's peak, the Haskell ball had been accepted and golf hadn't changed very much for 20 years.
The 30s - The beginning of the end for hickory shafts and the emergence of steel shafts, a time of turmoil for manufacturers and there were several mergers and closures.
The 40s - The impact of the Second World War saw golf clubs hanging on for survival or turning their land over for the war effort, at the end of the war there were more manufacturers disappearing.
The 50s - Not a great time in the UK but in the US some classic club designs evolved and some of the best persimmon drivers were made.
The 60s - Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus, golf became cool and it's popularity began to climb, some of the great club designs were produced. A golden age for golf.
The 70s - The boom continued, new courses, more superstar golfers and more great clubs but, alas, the first signs of the move away from blades with the Ping Eye and Browning 440 clubs.
The 80s - Saw a real downturn with metal woods taking over and golf hasn't been the same since. (Unless of course you buy yourself a set of vintage clubs and start to enjoy your golf to the full again!)
 

williamalex1

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The older i get the better i use to be, i keep telling people that , some don't believe me :ROFLMAO:. I accept my age and ability and enjoy every minute i can, good or bad.
 
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In my 20s, only just started the game, so was not a member just pay and play in decade I think and not very regular. Great to play many different courses as a result
In my 30s, started to play, become a member with friends, but within a few years had to give it up due to work commitments and working 80-110 hrs a week that just took over my life for over a decade apart from a society day or two a year
In my 40s, came back to it in mid 40s, have the money and time as family play, play different courses, am member at a number of courses, work commitments greatly reduced and play a lot of golf on holidays whilst son comes with us
in my 50s and beyond you will have to answer that question yourself:devilish: as I am to young :p:D

As the years go on golf has got better, as time, family and money allow more golf.

On top of that in your 40s normally you are still fairly fit, able, still have speed and feel, probably mellowed quite a bit as a character which means golf is more enjoyable and scores are not so important.

One of the best things that has changed over the decades is society golf for me and access to courses, as with the growth of the internet from my 30s to the 40s now it has opened up many more doors, like this forum for example and access to different courses if vastly easier/greater (used to have a AA[think it was} CD ROM with all golf courses listed before the internet or you had to rely on GM, Fore, todays golfer, Golf world mags listing some clubs near you or your holiday for details. Internet has been great for accessing different courses and meeting different people.
 
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I started in my teens, I enjoyed the game and got pretty decent, but never took it very seriously, and so didn't improve as much as I should have. But that is the age when you should dedicate yourself to the game.
I rarely played in my 20's, as there were too many important things to do (girls & drink)
In my 30's I've been more dedicated, trained more in order to get fitter. Mainly thanks to cash & being single, I can play where I want & when I want.
I turn 40 later on this year so I guess it's all down hill from there!
 

SatchFan

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I'm in my late 50's, retired and can play whenever I like. The main tip I would give to people of my age group is to pace yourself. My home course currently has 14 holes open and my Monday to Thursday gross scores this week have been +5, +4, +7 and +3. Tempting to play tomorrow to keep a reasonable run going but I will do all I can to resist because I can just start to feel the fatigue set in. Playing when tired it can feel more of a heave than a swing and that's when the poor form can kick in. If I really get the urge then I might just pop up and use the practice facilities. Problem is if I see an inviting empty first tee which can then be a real test of my willpower.
 

Orikoru

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20's - barely even played. My weekends were all about going out on the lash.
30's - you start thinking about a sport you can play for the rest of your life rather than football etc that you'd have to retire from soon enough. At 32 it's quite funny for me going from being the 'old man' of football to being one of the youngest in the clubhouse! I certainly haven't gained anymore disposable income - I think with house prices and how much everything costs these days, that's pretty much a myth from the past. Working Mon to Fri, yes time can be a factor, and I tend to play once a week with little to no practise in between. But while time and money are both factors, ironically when you are out on the course is the best time to forget about your time and money worries completely. :D
 

Hobbit

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I started playing over 50 years ago, and by my mid teens I almost lived at the golf club. Each decade brought its own, different challenges and rewards. And each decade also saw new things learned. Golf, as it continues to evolve both in terms of equipment and in its loosening of attitudes towards dress and stiff tradition doesn't seem to lose its gloss or attraction.

So what is golf like at 60, and retired, for me? There isn't the need to clock watch. Waking up to rain, which is rare since we moved to Spain last year, isn't an issue as there's always tomorrow. The distance may be dropping off but club up and it isn't an issue. I play my 'home' club every Saturday and any one of 6 other clubs every Wednesday. And if someone asks do I fancy a game on any other day I don't have to put in a day's leave with the office.

However, there is a danger of relaxing too much. Of not caring as much if the ball misses a green or a makable putt slides by. Sometimes I've got to remind myself to chase the next par/birdie/win. But as for the youngsters knocking their tee shot well past mine, my ball is on the green first.

Whats not to like about retired golf, especially in the sun?
 

williamalex1

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I started playing over 50 years ago, and by my mid teens I almost lived at the golf club. Each decade brought its own, different challenges and rewards. And each decade also saw new things learned. Golf, as it continues to evolve both in terms of equipment and in its loosening of attitudes towards dress and stiff tradition doesn't seem to lose its gloss or attraction.

So what is golf like at 60, and retired, for me? There isn't the need to clock watch. Waking up to rain, which is rare since we moved to Spain last year, isn't an issue as there's always tomorrow. The distance may be dropping off but club up and it isn't an issue. I play my 'home' club every Saturday and any one of 6 other clubs every Wednesday. And if someone asks do I fancy a game on any other day I don't have to put in a day's leave with the office.

However, there is a danger of relaxing too much. Of not caring as much if the ball misses a green or a makable putt slides by. Sometimes I've got to remind myself to chase the next par/birdie/win. But as for the youngsters knocking their tee shot well past mine, my ball is on the green first.

Whats not to like about retired golf, especially in the sun?
I'm going off you :sick::cool:
 

Scozzy

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35ish years of golf here as I stare at 50 next year.Loved everything about the game since that first time I flushed a drive back in the mid 80's and made"that" sound and felt the feedback thru the club, never gets old does it?
The frustration of the game simply has me waking up the next morning wanting to play again and redeem myself.
20's....smash it!
30's.....I'm gonna need a short game
40's.....treat myself to nicer kit and varied courses knowing it's just a game to enjoy and play what's in front of you, you'll never be in that exact situ again so go for it.
 

shane3003

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I’ve only been playing golf for 3 years, after giving the sport a go due to my boss nagging me, worked for a finance company and he said I was missing out!
I’m 32 only played on an ad hoc basis when staying away with work and the odd society day.
Joined my first club last year, thought it would help play more and make friends after moving to a new area.
Not really gone as planned, going back to playing on an ad hoc basis this year 🤷‍♂️
 

Sats

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I'm in my 40's and have been playing since my mid 30's as with any sport keep yourself in the best condition you can. Eat well and exercise - key to longevity.
 

jim8flog

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I am fortunate in that I have always been able to play when I liked (within reason) . I switched employment to give me that freedom of time.

Family was only a factor during the school holidays and weekends. I was only able to play one Saturday a month.

Like many I was a nomad golfer for the first few years and that experience has probably put me in good stead. Learning to play on a variety of course in different conditions.

It was only when I joined a club in my 30s that I truly became a more consistent player because once annual membership was paid I could play or practice as much as I liked without additional expenditure.

When I first joined the club the only way I could play with other players was to become an honorary members of the seniors section. Through them I gained a lot of knowledge from some very experienced players.

"In your 50s you begin to get more time, have fewer other commitments, can start playing in senior amateur events that you should be very competitive in given your relative youth in this bracket" This bit is so true although in this area it is age 55.

Now in my 60s I still enjoy the game as much as ever but age and injury means that I no longer hit the ball anywhere near as long as I used to but am still competitive against my peers. Wins in the seniors section still occur but in the clubs comps are a distant memory.

"In your 60s you have the chance to travel even more widely and modern golf equipment helps to counter the effect of ageing"
My 60s mean I longer like driving the car distances and although some changes in equipment have meant I still hit good distances for my age those same changes means big gaps between me and the young'uns.
 

Griffsters

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My simple advice would be to plan ahead, don't take fitness and flexibility for granted. Niggles and injuries that were shrugged off and recovered from in quick time during 20s / 30s can suddenly start to become chronic as you hit mid forties without proper attention. You can't enjoy sport if you are unable to participate anymore! Look after yourself and you can play and enjoy to a ripe old age.
 
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