Would you buy an electric car?

pauljames87

Journeyman Pro
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Messages
13,383
Location
Havering
The cabin filter seems to be a con at £140, unless there is more done in those "services" that's not mentioned. Tesla are £30 for a pair that they recommend to change every two years too. they are easy to change yourself in 5 minutes.
how much is tesla servings full stop?

I mean these charges seem stupidly high

I get my big juggernault serviced and MOTed for £200 every year including oil

and we are told EVs have little moving parts etc

seems to me PSA taking the P I ...
 

Smiffy

Grand Slam Winner
Joined
Oct 17, 2008
Messages
23,650
Location
Gods waiting room.....
Somebody is pulling your pudding.
Our service department would charge £66.00 for the first service on an e208.
2nd service, due at year 3, (or 16k), would cost £209.00 and includes brake fluid change, pollen filter, screen wash etc.
Rob
 

pauljames87

Journeyman Pro
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Messages
13,383
Location
Havering
Somebody is pulling your pudding.
Our service department would charge £66.00 for the first service on an e208.
2nd service, due at year 3, (or 16k), would cost £209.00 and includes brake fluid change, pollen filter, screen wash etc.
Rob
the first charge seems to vary from dealer to dealer I think i paid £80, £70 is on the website now but £66 seems fair

the second service ive got in writing somewhere that is in year 2 and year 1 is an additional service , then due year 4 and 6

ive checked this with vauxhall care and they confirmed that its year 2 , and will spread to the dealers

but this entirely proves my point you work for them and you are told one thing and another dealer will say another. its poor. everyone should be in line and knowing what to do
 

pool888

Assistant Pro
Joined
May 27, 2008
Messages
351
There is no set servicing with Tesla, they recommend replacing the cabin filter every 2 years, brake fluid check for contaminants every 2 years, A/C test every 6 years, tyre rotation as required. But it's all optional up to the driver, there is no warranty implications if you do not have anything done. Obviously something like the brakes should be checked even though they get very little use.
 

pauljames87

Journeyman Pro
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Messages
13,383
Location
Havering
Somebody is pulling your pudding.
Our service department would charge £66.00 for the first service on an e208.
2nd service, due at year 3, (or 16k), would cost £209.00 and includes brake fluid change, pollen filter, screen wash etc.
Rob
service.png

so this is from the robins and day website.. they were easiest to find servicing from i typed in my reg and it says year 2 service



infact I can tell you this has changed

Servicing
Every Corsa-e needs an initial service after one year or 8,000 miles, whichever comes soonest. Following this, there's a first scheduled service two years or 16,000 miles from the date of first registration. The Corsa’s service intervals then shift to every two years or 16,000 miles. That puts electric owners at a distinct advantage, as both the petrol and diesel versions of the Corsa require maintenance every 12 months, which inevitably raises costs – even with a service plan.

https://www.drivingelectric.com/vauxhall/corsa/running-costs

as I used to see on that very page what your telling me was what they said now they have changed to what ive been told so the word is getting out

so again, poor from PSA to not tell their dealers the correct information
 

spongebob59

Journeyman Pro
Joined
Jul 13, 2012
Messages
5,539
Location
Kent
Entrepreneur Jonathan Carrier reckons more people would drive electric cars if they had portable chargers in their boots. The electrical equivalent of a can of petrol.

So he’s launching one. Called the ZipCharge Go, he claims it’s a design world first. There are portable battery packs that work with electric cars. Generally, these are designed for giant American recreational vehicles, some of which have their own solar panels, and if you search YouTube you’ll come across allegedly comic videos of people recharging moribund Teslas with petrol generators, but the Go has been designed from the off to charge vehicles, and has the necessary software to pair up with them.

‘The inspiration was my brother, who lives in an end of terrace house in Twickenham and bought an EV for personal use. He was always queuing to charge it up, and I thought; ‘there must be a better way,’’ said Carrier.

You can buy halfway house EV chargers like the ThirdRock Energy Commando Plug, which comes with various electric outputs and plug types, but still needs to be connected to a building or a piece of street furniture before it will charge a car. Carrier’s product, which uses lithium-ion battery cells, and will be sold in three different power outputs (4, 6 and 8kWh) and is entirely free standing and portable. Taking a little over half an hour to charge, it provides a claimed range of about twenty miles, so would be suitable for getting you home from work rather than getting across the country.

Carrier is hoping the charger, which is set to be available in the second quarter of 2023, will have a ready market, claiming that 8.5m, or 40 per cent of car owning households in Britain don’t have access to off street parking, so the luxury of a reasonably rapid home charging box is denied them.

Carrier has a background in vehicle engineering, as does Richie Sibal, ZipCharge’s co-founder (the pair have worked for the likes of Lotus, Jaguar and McLaren) and talks about how the Go’s light, space frame aluminium sub structure is a homage to the way some sports cars are built.

It can be charged in a domestic setting using a regular three pin socket (or ‘granny plug,’ as Carrier puts it), and will do this during the cheapest tariff periods.

It’s designed to be used as a household power source as well as a vehicle charger, and its co-creator envisions buyers making use of power saved by the Go during cheaper periods instead of taking juice direct from the grid when it’s more expensive.

Wind and solar power generation have the advantage of producing a lot of electricity with zero emissions when the weather is right, but are relatively useless when it isn’t, and Carrier sees his device as having potential to store some of that energy when it’s being generated, to be used when there’s a lack of wind or sun.

‘When it’s not being used as a charger, our device can be plugged into the home and be used to feed electricity back into the grid,’ said Carrier. ‘We can save people a significant amount of energy, that would pay for EV charging with some surplus.’ Apparently, this ability to discharge both AC and DC current makes the Go ‘bi-directional.’

Electric cars are hefty things thanks to their batteries, and around 25kg for the 4kWh and under 49kg for the 8kWh Go, this box of electric tricks is no lightweight either, although its creator points out that its light enough to be taken on a plane, and being on wheels will help when moving it about.

If it’s left on a street plugged into your car, will they also help nefarious types from making off with it? Carrier doesn’t think so. The cabling locks on, the handle acts as a tether, and it’s controlled by a phone app. There are tracking, remote disabling functions and a ‘geo-fencing’ facility that means it will only work in a designated street, should you find your Go has gone. Whether the more gormless thieving practitioners will be deterred from reaching for their bolt cutters remains to be seen.

How much will it cost? The outright purchase price hasn’t been officially announced (think £1,500-£2,000, so not cheap), and the company is also touting a subscription model at around £49 a month.

All this could have been yours now were it not for the component shortage that has resulted in 18-month waiting lists for some electric cars. ‘We have a supply chain problem, with lead times of 52 weeks for some components,’ said Carrier.

But the new technology will surely allay fears from terraced home owners and those living in flats that they will be left behind in the push for more EVs and the phasing out of petrol cars. As more powerful and efficient chargers reach the market, living in these sorts of properties needn’t be a barrier to going electric.
 

PNWokingham

Journeyman Pro
Joined
Jun 20, 2010
Messages
3,026
Location
Berks
Germany could defy EU ban on petrol cars by 2035 as the Finance Minister rejected the EU plan. I think cracks are appearing in the whole Green agenda. Germany also is reversing trend on coal power due to the energy crisis - and UK is quite rightly pushing more home-grown energy security with new North Sea projects. I hope targets are watered down across the board as the market will dictate the pace and it will probably be a similar outcome anyway
 

spongebob59

Journeyman Pro
Joined
Jul 13, 2012
Messages
5,539
Location
Kent
Germany could defy EU ban on petrol cars by 2035 as the Finance Minister rejected the EU plan. I think cracks are appearing in the whole Green agenda. Germany also is reversing trend on coal power due to the energy crisis - and UK is quite rightly pushing more home-grown energy security with new North Sea projects. I hope targets are watered down across the board as the market will dictate the pace and it will probably be a similar outcome anyway
BRUSSELS, June 24 (Reuters) - Italy, Portugal, Slovakia, Bulgaria and Romania want to delay a European Union plan to effectively ban the sale of new petrol and diesel cars from 2035 by five years, according to a document seen by Reuters.

The policy is a key pillar of the EU's plans to tackle rising transport emissions and speed the shift to electric vehicles, as the bloc strives to cut economy-wide net greenhouse gas emissions 55% by 2030, from 1990 levels.
 

Aztecs27

Money List Winner
Joined
May 26, 2010
Messages
7,209
Location
Gloucester, UK
Just stuck my order in for a Skoda Enyaq via the salary sacrifice lease scheme we have at work. Lead time is about a year at the minute haha.

Would have gone for something else, but in my price range it's the biggest car available currently.
 

pauljames87

Journeyman Pro
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Messages
13,383
Location
Havering
Took little one swimming yesterday, the car park nearby has a Tesla supercharge station

Parked in it was 1 Tesla
And the following not EVs

Ferrari
Mini s
Mg

Even if they could claim to be electric they weren't plugged in so shouldn't use the bays

However the problem seems simple. Don't give EVs the best spaces. These are ground floor right near the exit ..

Ground floor is only disabled and these spaces so no average space and people are lazy they don't want to go upstairs

Why not put the ev chargers top floor.. nobody parks there..it's got lifts .. all good

It's same as baby parking they put the spaces in the best places so those without kids use them because they are better spaces

Put them far end of car park less chance .. then you would only get people who funny about their cars being dinged
 

DaveR

Head Pro
Joined
Jun 7, 2017
Messages
1,820
Took little one swimming yesterday, the car park nearby has a Tesla supercharge station

Parked in it was 1 Tesla
And the following not EVs

Ferrari
Mini s
Mg

Even if they could claim to be electric they weren't plugged in so shouldn't use the bays

However the problem seems simple. Don't give EVs the best spaces. These are ground floor right near the exit ..

Ground floor is only disabled and these spaces so no average space and people are lazy they don't want to go upstairs

Why not put the ev chargers top floor.. nobody parks there..it's got lifts .. all good

It's same as baby parking they put the spaces in the best places so those without kids use them because they are better spaces

Put them far end of car park less chance .. then you would only get people who funny about their cars being dinged
I've seen EVs in the charging bays at my local Tesco but they weren't plugged in.
 

pauljames87

Journeyman Pro
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Messages
13,383
Location
Havering
I've seen EVs in the charging bays at my local Tesco but they weren't plugged in.
I read something the other day on an EV forum that I never knew. Apparently podpoint and Tesco (who work together for the chargers) said you have to shop at Tesco to use the freebie

Now this was x amount of years ago, no signs back this up etc

So many people don't know it .. doubt they even enforce it

Heard another story of cafes installing chargers .. 7kw ones.. say about 5

Full English and an hours charge £10

The cabbies are loving it apparently
 

DaveR

Head Pro
Joined
Jun 7, 2017
Messages
1,820
I read something the other day on an EV forum that I never knew. Apparently podpoint and Tesco (who work together for the chargers) said you have to shop at Tesco to use the freebie

Now this was x amount of years ago, no signs back this up etc

So many people don't know it .. doubt they even enforce it

Heard another story of cafes installing chargers .. 7kw ones.. say about 5

Full English and an hours charge £10

The cabbies are loving it apparently
I was actually referring to the selfish stupidity of some people bit like those that abuse disabled parking spaces.
 

pauljames87

Journeyman Pro
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Messages
13,383
Location
Havering
I was actually referring to the selfish stupidity of some people bit like those that abuse disabled parking spaces.
There will always be selfish people, only spaces at front of car park should be disabled as they can benefit from the access

Baby and child should be somewhere out way , need the space around rather than to be at front. People just misuse to get near the front

My club got it spot on with charging bays

Far end of car park..nobody misusing them because their so out the way people want to be as close as possible unless they want a charge
 

bobmac

Major Champion
Joined
Feb 2, 2009
Messages
25,754
Location
Lincolnshire
I was actually referring to the selfish stupidity of some people bit like those that abuse disabled parking spaces.
I don't agree.
If a handicapped driver can't park in a handicapped space because an able bodied person was too lazy to park a bit further away, there are other 'normal' spaces available.
If a non EV driver parks in a charging bay, they have done it on purpose to stop someone charging.
 

hovis

Tour Winner
Joined
Aug 13, 2010
Messages
5,996
However the problem seems simple. Don't give EVs the best spaces. These are ground floor right near the exit ..

Ground floor is only disabled and these spaces so no average space and people are lazy they don't want to go upstairs

Why not put the ev chargers top floor.. nobody parks there..it's got lifts .. all good

Put them far end of car park less chance .. then you would only get people who funny about their cars being dinged
Have you stopped to think about your statement? Put the chargers upstairs? You do know that you can't simply plug in an extension lead and have them on the top floor.
The work involved to rectro fit high voltage cable underground (as required by law) To a charging station is immense. It makes sense to keep them close to the building to keep cost low. If you was a business owner would you fork out the extra?
 

pauljames87

Journeyman Pro
Joined
Apr 1, 2016
Messages
13,383
Location
Havering
Have you stopped to think about your statement? Put the chargers upstairs? You do know that you can't simply plug in an extension lead and have them on the top floor.
The work involved to rectro fit high voltage cable underground (as required by law) To a charging station is immense. It makes sense to keep them close to the building to keep cost low. If you was a business owner would you fork out the extra?
Very true. However a normal car park like Tesco, why put them right by the door instead of out the way a bit .. out the way they won't get misused

Extra cabling for distance maybe but I'm sure a work around then right by the disabled bays so people just use them because there next to the door
 
Top