They Shall Not Grow Old.......

Blue in Munich

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There's a personal connection for Mark Knopfler. From Wikipedia;

"Piper to the End" is a Celtic folk song written by Mark Knopfler, the lead singer and songwriter for the rock band Dire Straits. The song is the final track on Knopfler's solo album Get Lucky.

The song is about Knopfler's uncle Freddie who was a piper of the 1st Battalion, Tyneside Scottish, the Black Watch, Royal Highland Regiment. Freddie carried his pipes into action in World War II and was killed with fellow fighters at Ficheux, near Arras in the north of France in May 1940. He was just 20 years old.[1]

Knopfler describes the moment of Freddie's death in the latter's own words:

This has been a day to die on
Now the day is almost done
Here the pipes will lay beside me
Silent with the battle drum
Knopfler explains that he never knew Freddie personally, his mother's brother, but that he was very close to his uncle Kingsley, Freddie's older brother. Kingsley taught Knopfler to play the boogie-woogie piano.

Knopfler explained in an interview, "The pipes always made sense to me, and growing up in Glasgow as well as Newcastle, in my grandmother's home, there were Jimmy Shand records, so the sound of Celtic music always seems familiar to me."

 

Tashyboy

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Spent yesterday with the local legion. Wore me grandads medals on the March. First time they have been worn since being presented for his service in WW2..
Weather was fantastic compared to what we have over the last week or so. A absolutely fantastic turnout. Heard some fantastic stories. Drunk copious amounts of alcohol and port. Felt honoured to be amongst them.
Last night was a blur.
 
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pauldj42

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Spent yesterday with the local legion. Wore me grandads medals on the March. First time they have been worn since being presented for his service in WW2..
Weather was fantastic compared to what we have over the last week or so. A absolutely fantastic turnout. Heard some fantastic stories. Drunk copious amounts of alcohol and port. Felt honoured to be amongst them.
Last night was a blur.
Pictures mate, before and after. (y)
 

Tashyboy

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Pictures mate, before and after. (y)
On the Saturday the branch once more marched onto the Pitch at Mansfield rugby club. It is an excellent day out which includes a free bar. Tash as usual was sensible knowing what was coming yesterday. Anyway I took my camera to take photos instead of using my phone. I took some stonkers.
So with that in mind I took said camera along yesterday. Not had a chance to go through them all but I know there once more will be some belters. Was some memorable moments yesterday, but definately one of them was a lady who volunteered her services. She stood on stage in front of 300 people and played the last post on the violin. It was simply stunning. It was so quiet you could hear a cockroach fart. The sound was just stunningly melodic. Grown rufty tufty servicemen with tears in there eyes. But not as many tears as hers when finished. The applause was deafening.
Got talking to a guy in a kilt, ( his brothers who died in Feb 2019). Anyway he plays the bagpipes, played for the local Seaforths for many a year. Anyway after a little persuasion from tash, he has volunteered to play for us next year.
I was delicate last night 😖
 
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Church was busy yesterday and as always a good turnout just down the road from us for the service of remembrance at the town's war memorial. And poignant as we reflected as I did this morning that the 2min silence originated in our town on 1st May 1916...and held just half mile away from me now.

FOR I WILL GIVE YOU THE MORNING STAR
In the sunset of an age and an epoch we may write that for epitaph of the men who were of it. They went quiet and brave from the lands they loved, though seldom of that love might they speak, it was not in them to tell in words of the earth that moved and lived and abided, their life and enduring love. And who knows at the last what memories of it were with them, the springs and the winters of this land and all the sounds and scents of it that had once been theirs, deep, and a passion of their blood and spirit, those four who died in France?


(Lewis Grassic Gibbon Sunset Song)
 

SocketRocket

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Well the sun's shining now on these green fields of France;
The warm wind blows gently and the red poppies dance.
The trenches have vanished long under the plough
No gas and no barbed wire, no guns firing now.
But here in this graveyard that's still No Man’s Land
The countless white crosses in mute witness stand
To man's blind indifference to his fellow man,
And a whole generation who were butchered and damned.
 
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Well the sun's shining now on these green fields of France;
The warm wind blows gently and the red poppies dance.
The trenches have vanished long under the plough
No gas and no barbed wire, no guns firing now.
But here in this graveyard that's still No Man’s Land
The countless white crosses in mute witness stand
To man's blind indifference to his fellow man,
And a whole generation who were butchered and damned.
Ah Willie McBride...

Many thanks SR for reminding me of that words of that beautiful and moving lament
 

Farneyman

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Love this version with Finbar Furey and Christy Dignam.

Green Fields of France / Willie Mc Bride was a great song written by Eric Bogle to help tackle anti-Irish prejudice in the 1970 and as a subtle reminder of the Irish who died helping preserve the British empire

He also wrote the classic The Band Played Waltzing Matilda and All the Fine Young Men which were also based on WW1
 

Old Skier

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On the Saturday the branch once more marched onto the Pitch at Mansfield rugby club. It is an excellent day out which includes a free bar. Tash as usual was sensible knowing what was coming yesterday. Anyway I took my camera to take photos instead of using my phone. I took some stonkers.
So with that in mind I took said camera along yesterday. Not had a chance to go through them all but I know there once more will be some belters. Was some memorable moments yesterday, but definately one of them was a lady who volunteered her services. She stood on stage in front of 300 people and played the last post on the violin. It was simply stunning. It was so quiet you could hear a cockroach fart. The sound was just stunningly melodic. Grown rufty tufty servicemen with tears in there eyes. But not as many tears as hers when finished. The applause was deafening.
Got talking to a guy in a kilt, ( his brothers who died in Feb 2019). Anyway he plays the bagpipes, played for the local Seaforths for many a year. Anyway after a little persuasion from tash, he has volunteered to play for us next year.
I was delicate last night 😖
We suffer from dust allergies, nothing more, you'll learn
 

SocketRocket

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Love this version with Finbar Furey and Christy Dignam.

Green Fields of France / Willie Mc Bride was a great song written by Eric Bogle to help tackle anti-Irish prejudice in the 1970 and as a subtle reminder of the Irish who died helping preserve the British empire

He also wrote the classic The Band Played Waltzing Matilda and All the Fine Young Men which were also based on WW1
Comes over to me as a salute to all those that died in WW1 what ever country they were from and how futile and mindless the loss of life was
 

Wolf

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First time since they were born my youngest 3 really all grasped the significance of remembrance day and what it means to myself as former serviceman and to others all over the world. They watched the entire rembrance parade Sunday and were silent throughout, my youngest son did a little newspaper article for his homework afterwards about his great grandads service in WW2 and my 2 youngest daughters made their own poppies and wrote little notes of thanks on them and asked if it would be OK to lay them at our local memorial. It's little things like that which make me proud not only if my kids and my service but of all those who have served and being remembered hopefully forevermore by future generations as long as we continue to teach them the reasons for it and not brush it aside.
 

Farneyman

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Comes over to me as a salute to all those that died in WW1 what ever country they were from and how futile and mindless the loss of life was
Just going by what Bogle - the guy who wrote it said.

Bogle revealed he chose the name “Willie McBride” for the 19-year-old who features in the song because of its “Irish connotations”. Bogle said he wrote The Green Fields of France in 1975, a year after the Birmingham and Guildford bombings unleashed a wave of anti-Irish sentiment in Britain.

Bogle told presenter Myles Dungan the song was a “subtle reminder” to British people that thousands of Irishmen had died in the first World War in the service of the British Empire. However, he conceded that the reference was so subtle that “most people missed it”.

He added: “The Irish were not flavour of the month in the UK. A lot of Irishmen died preserving the British Empire during World War I. The reasons they fought and died was rarely to preserve the British Empire. It was a bit of fun, adventure and a way to making a living. Nonetheless, a lot of them died. It was a wee reminder that they weren’t all Tommy Atkins (the generic name for English soldiers at the time).”

From an article in The Irish Times

https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/...tten-to-tackle-anti-irish-prejudice-1.2108217
 

SocketRocket

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Just going by what Bogle - the guy who wrote it said.

Bogle revealed he chose the name “Willie McBride” for the 19-year-old who features in the song because of its “Irish connotations”. Bogle said he wrote The Green Fields of France in 1975, a year after the Birmingham and Guildford bombings unleashed a wave of anti-Irish sentiment in Britain.

Bogle told presenter Myles Dungan the song was a “subtle reminder” to British people that thousands of Irishmen had died in the first World War in the service of the British Empire. However, he conceded that the reference was so subtle that “most people missed it”.

He added: “The Irish were not flavour of the month in the UK. A lot of Irishmen died preserving the British Empire during World War I. The reasons they fought and died was rarely to preserve the British Empire. It was a bit of fun, adventure and a way to making a living. Nonetheless, a lot of them died. It was a wee reminder that they weren’t all Tommy Atkins (the generic name for English soldiers at the time).”

From an article in The Irish Times

https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/...tten-to-tackle-anti-irish-prejudice-1.2108217
OK, although I prefer my understanding of it, for me the meaning transcends borders and nationality and is pertinent what ever country the soldier came from, those poor lads were lions lead by donkeys.
 
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