The old wedge shaft debate

Crow

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Looks like I don't have to tell you, you've worked it out for yourself. I told people for years that nobody needed more than three wedges, now I have four! BUT, I've also got a four iron with the loft & length of a three iron, which I can actually hit much better than I can hit a traditional three. OK, I'll acknowledge that the manufacturers have used a bit of psychology in the numbering but any intelligent person can see that. I just wish the makers would make a set of 5 irons covering the length & loft currently covered by the 4 to 9 iron so that I could put the 5 wood back into the bag.

And I don't think the manufacturers sell more clubs because of this. Where someone would previously buy a 4 to PW set they might buy 5 to PW plus a hybrid, or even 6 to PW & two hybrids.

People who say the manufacturers are conning the public are underestimating the intelligence of the majority of customers.
If any intelligent person can see that why do practically all golfers talk about the distance gains they've got from their new irons?
 

Ser Shankalot

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And I don't think the manufacturers sell more clubs because of this. Where someone would previously buy a 4 to PW set they might buy 5 to PW plus a hybrid, or even 6 to PW & two hybrids.

People who say the manufacturers are conning the public are underestimating the intelligence of the majority of customers.
Hasn't the limit been 14 clubs in a bag for decades? So whether one believes in the technical argument or not of changing lofts, I'm not sure how we could end up with any more clubs being sold in total - it's just the mix has changed for those with stronger lofts? If it works for the customer then great and if not no big deal - customer still uses the same total number. Maybe it's a way to get people to adopt the latest models - but I don't see how that is different from any other industry. Better than mobile phones, where they will make old models redundant on purpose so you have no choice.
 
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If any intelligent person can see that why do practically all golfers talk about the distance gains they've got from their new irons?
Because they go further. A couple of years ago I changed from Mizuno JPX 850 irons to Wilson D7. The Wilson 7 iron, same loft & length as the Mizuno 6 iron, gave me an extra 10 yards. The benefits of modern design / materials.
 

patricks148

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I think I just have DG wedge flex in mine, which I think; I could be wrong is S200. In that time I had very stiff Kbs C taper 120 in my irons and didn't find it a problem. I did have S300 in my gap and Sw when I got my MP57 fitted some 14 years ago. There must be a reason that wedges are offered by all Manufacturers in a slightly softer flex?
 

Voyager EMH

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I stopped doing the comparison thing about 20 years ago.
Each club has the distance that you hit it.
How this hit-distance compares with other clubs of different manufacturers from different years with different designs and numbers or letters on the sole is largely irrelevant.
You simply need a set of clubs that you are comfortable with.
 

Crow

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Because they go further. A couple of years ago I changed from Mizuno JPX 850 irons to Wilson D7. The Wilson 7 iron, same loft & length as the Mizuno 6 iron, gave me an extra 10 yards. The benefits of modern design / materials.
If the 7 iron went 10 yards further than the 6 iron they should have stamped a 5 on the bottom, then they needn't have conned the public into buying additional clubs.
 

BiMGuy

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This is why they should stamp lofts on clubs not numbers. Or at least both.

It was discussed previously, but some people thought it might be a bit confusing.

Back to wedge shafts. It depends is the answer. I use set wedges up to my 50* then have a 54* and 58* sand wedges. These had the same lightweight graphite shafts as my previous irons. I’ve got new irons now with steel shafts again. But, have kept the wedges as they are brilliant with the light shafts.
 

Orikoru

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Not even sure what my wedge flexes are. I think one of them actually says 'wedge flex' and I don't know what that means. :LOL: I guessed it was kind of stiffer than a regular iron, but I don't really know.
 

patricks148

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Not even sure what my wedge flexes are. I think one of them actually says 'wedge flex' and I don't know what that means. :LOL: I guessed it was kind of stiffer than a regular iron, but I don't really know.
Mine say on the sticker, I've got S200 and S400, which is "stiffer" than reg I think 🤔
 

Imurg

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The biggest problem with terms like S200, S300 etc is that they no longer reflect the weight of the shaft..
With the original Dynamic Gold S300 was 130g, S200 127g and S400 133g - to most of us there would be negligee difference in 6g of weight.
These days, however, you have Sxxx being used in shafts weighing from about 95g up to 133g
So Sxxx means little other than it being a stiff shaft compared to others in that model of shaft
I bet the XP95 S300 isn't as stiff as the DG S300...
 
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The biggest problem with terms like S200, S300 etc is that they no longer reflect the weight of the shaft..
With the original Dynamic Gold S300 was 130g, S200 127g and S400 133g - to most of us there would be negligee difference in 6g of weight.
These days, however, you have Sxxx being used in shafts weighing from about 95g up to 133g
So Sxxx means little other than it being a stiff shaft compared to others in that model of shaft
I bet the XP95 S300 isn't as stiff as the DG S300...
If its a 'wedge' then its stiff. So an xp95 wedge... is an xp 95 stiff etc etc. As with all things golf standardisation is the last thing the industry seems to want...
 
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If the 7 iron went 10 yards further than the 6 iron they should have stamped a 5 on the bottom, then they needn't have conned the public into buying additional clubs.
As someone has already said, you can only carry 14 so I'm not sure how you can be "conned". Substituting a gap wedge for a 4 iron results in the same number of clubs.
 
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The next time you feel the need to educate me in matters golf, please don't.



You think so?
View attachment 39713
I'm sorry, but I honestly think that the whole point of what manufacturers do is to make the clubs easier to hit & a byproduct of that is that the lofts can be strengthened without making the clubs unplayable. Among my many golfing pals there isn't one who doesn't know that modern clubs have stronger lofts. Who says the number has to reflect how far the ball goes anyway? What about if it reflected the launch angle? The reason that the manufacturers use higher numbers IS psychological. A player is likely to believe "I can hit a 5 iron, but not a 4 iron" so is more likely to buy a set starting at 5 rather than 4. So, I'm sorry but, despite your many years in the golf profession, I disagree with your opinion.
 

bobmac

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People who say the manufacturers are conning the public are underestimating the intelligence of the majority of customers.
The reason that the manufacturers use higher numbers IS psychological. A player is likely to believe "I can hit a 5 iron, but not a 4 iron" so is more likely to buy a set starting at 5 rather than 4. So, I'm sorry but, despite your many years in the golf profession, I disagree with your opinion.
So the manufacturers sell you a set 4-Sw, then you discover you can't hit the 4 iron because it's really a 3 so you have to buy a hybrid. Maybe two if you cant hit the 5(4) iron.
Then you are told you need specialised wedges including a GW or two to fill the 13 deg gap between the PW and SW, maybe a LW too.
So now you have the 4 and 5 iron in the shed together with the PW and SW and a bill for two replacement hybrids and 4 wedges that will make your eyes water.

I have no problem with people buying hybrids or specialised wedges, it's their money and if makes golf easier and more fun, go for it.
It's just a shame you cant buy a set of irons 6-9.
Then you just add the hybrids and wedges as required.
 
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then you discover you can't hit the 4 iron because it's really a 3 so you have to buy a hybrid.
But this doesn't happen. I couldn't hit a conventional 3 iron but I can hit my current 4 iron, which has the loft & length of a conventional 3 because it is made in such a way that it is easy to launch. That's the whole point of game improvement clubs designed for beginners & frail old farts like me.
It's just a shame you cant buy a set of irons 6-9.
You can, many manufacturers offer this option, as well as combo sets.
 

bobmac

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You can, many manufacturers offer this option, as well as combo sets.
You're right. After a bit of digging I found Srixon do a set for £566
Add on a couple of hybrids and a set of decent wedges and you are well over £1,200.
Just stay away from the new Ping wedges...£199 each
 
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