Ben Hogan Edge EX Irons

Thread starter #1

Hoganman1

Active member
Joined
Nov 24, 2018
Messages
326
I've been playing these for a little over a year and love them. I'm 72 with a 9.3 index. I bought the 4-PW with regular graphite shafts. While they are "game improvement" irons the lofts are not jacked-up. The four iron is 20* and there are 4* between each iron down to the 44* PW. They look great at address. I had Mizuno JPX 850s before these and while they were good, I prefer the Hogans. They're only available online and are a little cheaper than larger company's offerings. They also have a demo program that allows one to try before you buy.
 

Foxholer

Blackballed
Joined
Nov 16, 2011
Messages
24,168
A Hogan 6i was my first 'proper' steel shafted iron, courtesy of the Pro and my teacher at my first club. It felt quite a bit softer than my graphite shafted TM Firesoles, but the surprising thing was the 3 shots were all within 2 yards in actual distance! I was convinced that steel shafted irons were the way to go and haven't had graphite irons since.
As a fairly 'old school' iron player, I don't give a toss about the 'improd performance' of jacked lofts of current models. The feel from a well struck Miura forged iron is sufficient joy for me!
Good to see that Callaway are still keeping the Hogan brand separate.
 
Thread starter #5

Hoganman1

Active member
Joined
Nov 24, 2018
Messages
326
In old money, 20* is a 2 iron and 44* is an 8 iron.
This all began decades ago when KING COBRA introduced their new irons with stronger lofts. Today the number on the club is really meaningless. The Ben Hogan Company actually had sets that didn't have numbers. Each iron had the loft on the head like most wedges. The key is knowing how far you can play each iron regardless of what number is on the head. We have a par three at our club that is 145 yards. I play my six iron while others in my group play a seven or even an eight iron. However, we usually all leave the green having scored a three. That's all that matters when we settle the bets. Hogan said it best when asked how far he hit a six iron. He said that was the wrong question. The question should be how close.

Also, I stand corrected. The lofts on my irons are stronger than the standards of years ago. However, one guy I know plays Titleist T-400 irons. His eight iron is 29* which is about the same as my Hogan six iron.
 
Last edited:
Thread starter #6

Hoganman1

Active member
Joined
Nov 24, 2018
Messages
326
Well unfortunately Ben Hogan Golf has ceased building and selling clubs. I hate to see them go, but maybe they'll come back as they did once before. I'm just glad I got a set last year. My guess is they may sell off any inventory through some of the secondary market sites online. Ironically, they shut down twenty five years to the day the great Ben Hogan left us.
 

Foxholer

Blackballed
Joined
Nov 16, 2011
Messages
24,168
This all began decades ago when KING COBRA introduced their new irons with stronger lofts. Today the number on the club is really meaningless. The Ben Hogan Company actually had sets that didn't have numbers. Each iron had the loft on the head like most wedges. The key is knowing how far you can play each iron regardless of what number is on the head. We have a par three at our club that is 145 yards. I play my six iron while others in my group play a seven or even an eight iron. However, we usually all leave the green having scored a three. That's all that matters when we settle the bets. Hogan said it best when asked how far he hit a six iron. He said that was the wrong question. The question should be how close.

Also, I stand corrected. The lofts on my irons are stronger than the standards of years ago. However, one guy I know plays Titleist T-400 irons. His eight iron is 29* which is about the same as my Hogan six iron.
Or my 5 iron!
I recall that, a while ago, a PGAT Pro had clubs with no number, just lofts. Can't remember his name or the brand of clubs, but I'm certain they weren't Hogans.
 
Top