Accents

Pin-seeker

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Growing up in a mining village ave heard tons of accents. Some nice to listen to others not so. But ave got to say although the east country accent is lovely and soft to hear. Is there any English language in it. Am struggling with it 😄
Thoughts on accents please.
Oh and good to be in a pub.
Growing up in a mining village myself I don’t really have a problem with the different accents,not right keen on scabs tho 😬
 

fundy

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I love accents, I love trying to guess where people are from based on there accent. I once made the mistake of calling a lad from Sunderland a Geordie:oops:
I was born in Southampton but moved to Liverpool at 5 years old, before moving back down south a good few years later. I talk with a full Hampshire ('aaampshirre) accent, however when I go back up north to visit friends I automatically slip back into scouse, which the mrs finds hilarious and frustrating in equal measures!:ROFLMAO:

When I got to University as a very wet behind the ears fresher I was introduced to my room mate Geordie John. One of the nicest guys you could ever meet, but actually a Mackem not a Geordie lol!!!! took 18 year old me from hertfordshire several weeks to get my head around lol. He ran the pub quiz, everyones favourite round was TV, fillems and boooks :D
 
Joined
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I love accents, I love trying to guess where people are from based on there accent. I once made the mistake of calling a lad from Sunderland a Geordie:oops:
I was born in Southampton but moved to Liverpool at 5 years old, before moving back down south a good few years later. I talk with a full Hampshire ('aaampshirre) accent, however when I go back up north to visit friends I automatically slip back into scouse, which the mrs finds hilarious and frustrating in equal measures!:ROFLMAO:
oooh, never mistake a mackem for a geordie, or vice versa.

I have the same issues when I go back to monkey hanger land and see my school mates, even when I’m on the phone the them, when finished my wife looks at me and asks “why are you talking like that”
 

Hobbit

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oooh, never mistake a mackem for a geordie, or vice versa.

I have the same issues when I go back to monkey hanger land and see my school mates, even when I’m on the phone the them, when finished my wife looks at me and asks “why are you talking like that”
And calling a Smoggie a Geordie doesn’t go down well either. I left Middlesbrough at an early age, and left the UK a few years later. Then to the Lake District, back to Middlesbrough, onto South Shields, and back to Middlesbrough. Then Scunthorpe, and onto Manchester. Back to Middlesbrough, then to Aberdeen and finally Spain.

When people first meet me I’m often taken for a Geordie till they hear the Mrs. Then she’s a Geordie and I’m from North Yorks. But she’s a Boro lass to the core, first leaving at 30, with a couple of stints back there. I tend not to have problems understanding people apart the rawest of Glaswegians and proper Wallsend Geordies, oh and add real Black Country. The Mrs is clueless with most accents.

I love different accents, and even picking up on the different Spanish accents. Northern Spain is quite harsh compared to here, but here they sound softer and also leave out full words. Go 2 hours west to Granada and you’ll even see different spellings. Bizarrely, a Spaniard understands a Portuguese person no problem and both can converse - I haven’t got a clue with Portuguese but my Spanglish is coming on nicely.
 

jim8flog

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When I was a teenager I worked in a holiday camp as summer job.

I worked with 8 Scottish girls and two guys from Gateshead it took me few weeks to understand everything that was being said . It is not just about accents bit also local languages.

When I first moved to Somerset there was one family where the wife had to 'translate' everything her husband said for many a visit. He had lived in the same village and worked on the same farm all his life.
 

Voyager EMH

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Of course being Guildford born and bred, I've absolutely no accent at all;)

Been in Wales 12 years after 20 in Wiltshire. No trace of either accent........ yet
I don't mean to offend, but everyone has an accent.

I have relatives from Cornwall to Aberdeen and in South Wales. Dad was born in Barnsley but his mum and dad were from Aberdeen. They (grandparents, not dad) eventually settled in Cornwall where I have an uncle and cousin. Mum was from the Rhondda Valley and her mum lived with us during my childhood.
I grew up with lots of different accents and dialects. At school I would occasionally use a dialect word (Scottish or Welsh) that was used at home, but no one (including teachers) knew what I was saying.
My brother and I can mimic lots of different accents fairly accurately. My favourite is Geordie, because I can throw in lots of dialect words as well, having lived on Tyneside for 5 years in my twenties.
My late father-in-law was Leicester City born and bred. He had a strong accent. It was nothing like today's Leicester "town" accent. The nearest to his accent is now spoken around the Leicestershire/Derbyshire borders. (Previous comment about Leicester accent refers to modern town accent which, I agree, is appalling)
My late mother-in-law was from Glasgow - superb accent. Everyone (English) understood every word she ever said.
 

stefanovic

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I always think of the Leicester accent as more a lazy way of speaking rather than a proper accent, shortened words and sentences etc, I can't defend it.
I thought the English language started in Leicestershire. So the accent should be the most original.
Isaac Newton came from Lincs/Leics border, so he probably spoke with the accent you can't defend.
 
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